providence journal

Kudos and congrats to former Providence Phoenix news editor David Scharfenberg, who is set to join the Boston Globe's Statehouse reporting team.

Scharfenberg left the Phoenix last year to cover politics for WBUR, the Boston public radio station. He begins at the Globe June 9, as one of two new hires at the daily.

Thanks for stopping by for my Friday column. You can follow me through the week on the twitters and your thoughts and feedback are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org. Let's head in.

A hint of summer in the air as we tap away this afternoon, so welcome back to my Friday column, where your tips and thoughts are always welcome via idonnis (at) ripr (dot). You can follow my news and notes through the week via the twitters. Here we go.

In a significant loss for the Providence Journal, one of its most expert and experienced beat reporters, medical writer Felice Freyer, is leaving in early June to take a job at The Boston Globe.

Raymond McKay’s Republican U.S. Senate candidacy seems to depend on his legal battle with Warwick city officials over whether he should be allowed to keep his city job while he runs for office.

Local media outlets have much of McKay’s alleged ``right’’ to run for any office he chooses. Steve Brown of the R.I. Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union told the Providence Journal that the Warwick city ordinance that bars classified municipal employees from running for office is ``overly broad’’ and too restrictive.

Welcome back to my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Let's get to it.

Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and my short missives can be found on the twitters. Let's head right in:

Don Bousquet

After more than thirty years with the Providence Journal, celebrated Rhode Island cartoonist Don Bousquet is retiring.

Bousquet contributed thousands of cartoons, lampooning Rhode Island life to the Journal, which ran two per week. He said coming up with his signature, single panel style, was easy.

“I wanted to be a New Yorker cartoonist because somewhere I heard they paid eight hundred dollars for a single panel cartoon," said Bousquet.

It's a time of transition, in the weather, the political landscape (item #1), and the media (#5), so thanks for stopping by for my Friday column. Your thoughts and tips are always welcome, and you can follow me all week long on the twitters. Let's get to it.

Phil Marcelo, part of the Providence Journal's three-person Statehouse bureau, plans to leave the newspaper after seven years to take a reporting job with the Boston office of The Associated Press, Marcelo tells me. His start date is March 31.

In part, the change reflects how the AP has emerged as a stable source of reporting jobs amid continued uncertainty in the newspaper industry. Marcelo's Statehouse predecessor, Steve Peoples, who left the ProJo for a job with Roll Call in 2010, has fared well since joining the AP.

Stephen L. Brown, longtime associate publisher of the Providence Phoenix, is leaving the alternative newspaper after a career of nearly four decades as a leader in New England’s alternative newspaper landscape.

Brown, of Jamestown, turns 60 next month. Steve started in newspapering at the University of Vermont, where he began working on the student newspaper, `The Vermont Cynic’ as an undergraduate in the 1970s.

Welcome back to my weekly column. Don your ear muffs, cook up some cocoa and settle in for another exciting seven days in Rhode Island politics. Your thoughts are always welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and feel free to follow me on the twitters. Let's get to it.

What a week in Rhode Island politics. Welcome back to my weekly column, and thanks for stopping by. As always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Let's get snapping.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Providence mayor Joseph R. Paolino Jr. sat down at his Dorrance Street real estate office earlier this week to talk about his recent property acquisitions; downtown Providence; the city's economic challenges; the Superman Building; a possible mayoral run by Buddy Cianci; and the future of the Providence Journal.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Providence mayor Joseph R. Paolino Jr., who was part of a group that tried to buy WLNE-TV (Channel 6) in 2011, is keeping his cards close to his vest on whether he's looking at being part of an effort to acquire the Providence Journal.

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