Providence Water Supply Board

R.I.P. Chris Nocera

Jul 17, 2015

Christopher Nocera, a longtime Providence political operative, Elmhurst neighborhood activist and City Hall fixture, died suddenly last night. He was 60.

A burly man with an infectious sense of humor, Nocera was instrumental in Patrick Kennedy’s 1988 campaign for state representative in Elmhurst and Mount Pleasant that launched the career of  Kennedy, Ted Kennedy’s son, who later became a Congressman. Nocera put together a fine ground voter turn-out effort that propelled Kennedy to victory over then Rep. Jack Skeffington, a Mount Pleasant funeral director.

A boil water order remains in effect for 25,000 customers of the Kent County Water Authority after tests showed the water was contaminated with E. coli bacteria

School was held Monday in West Warwick but it wasn’t completely business as usual.  Bottled water was trucked in Sunday afternoon, as soon as school officials learned of the problem with E. Coli bacteria in the water supply. And other changes were made to keep kids safe, according to Kenneth Townsend, the school department’s director of property services.

file / RIPR

The public is invited to comment Tuesday on a proposed rate increase by the Providence Water Supply Board. Because Providence sells its water to other municipalities, the rate increase would affect residents in nearly 60 percent of the state.

It’s the first rate hike in four years, and for city residents it means a 24 percent increase. The water board says that’s an additional $6.00 for the average customer.

For the cities of Warwick and East Providence, and for the Kent County and Bristol County water authorities, rates would go up 32 percent.

thisisbossi / Flickr

If there is one government service most Rhode Islanders take for granted, it’s the drinking water that flows from our faucets. RIPR political analyst  Scott MacKay says that may not be the case in the future.

One of Rhode Island’s grand assets is the millions of gallons of water that flows every day from the Scituate Reservoir to the sinks, bubblers and bathtubs that serve 60 percent of our state. In a state with a serious inferiority complex about so much, our water is the boast of a small state.

If there is one government service most Rhode Islanders take for granted, it’s the drinking water that flows from our faucets. RIPR political analyst  Scott MacKay says that may not be the case in the future.

One of Rhode Island’s grand assets is the millions of gallons of water that flows every day from the Scituate Reservoir to the sinks, bubblers and bathtubs that serve 60 percent of our state. In a state with a serious inferiority complex about so much, our water is the boast of a small state.

Pages