Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

House Minority Leader Brian Newberry (R-North Smithfield) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the possible fate in the General Assembly of the 2011 pension overhaul; continued fallout from the failure of 38 Studios; and the intensifying race for governor.

Longtime GOP fundraiser Tony Bucci has joined Ken Block's Republican gubernatorial campaign as a senior adviser and finance chairman.

Block's campaign says Bucci resigned a slot on rival Republican Allan Fung's campaign committee to make the change.

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, a Republican candidate for governor, joins Bonus Q+A to talk about jobs; Sakonnet tolls, education, campaign finance, education, 38 Studios and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss his GOP run for governor; the outlook for the Providence Journal; and whether raising the minimum wage would be good for people and the economy.

Both Rhode Island Democratic U.S. Senators supported Majority Leader Harry Reid’s  decision to change Senate rules to break Republican filibusters of President Obama’s nominees.

Sen. Jack Reed said he doesn’t see the change to get a majority rule threshhold for nominees as a victory for either Democrats or Republicans. Rather, Reed said, ``the goal is to get Congress working more effectively because the country deserves better.’’

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung has hired three consultants for his Republican gubernatorial campaign:

Via news release:

Gubernatorial candidate Ken Block, who joined the Republican Party last month, is looking to burnish his GOP credentials by attending a Republican Governors Association training session for candidates in Arizona later this month. Cranston Mayor Allan Fung also plans to attend the get-together in Scottsdale on November 21-22.

In a statement, Block says he was happy to be invited and hopes to learn from Republican governors:

Republican candidate for governor Ken Block joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss the economy, Sakonnet tolls, his view of budget savings, and a host of other issues.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Republican candidate for governor Ken Block joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss his campaign; why he became a Republican; the fate of the Moderate Party; his plan to save $1 billion over four years; and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Do voters really want substance in their candidates?

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung is set to announce his Republican run for governor at 10 a.m. Monday at Taco, the Cranston-based manufacturer, according to campaign spokesman Patrick Sweeney. The campaign launch also includes a rally at 6 that evening at Chapel Grille at Sockanosset Crossroads.

The Washington Post has the story on how Rhode Island's Joseph Caramadre case has reverberated in the Virginia governor's race. The story, by Post reporter Laura Vozzella, describes how ``a dying mechanic wanted a few thousand dollars to leave to his wife, two sons and infant daughter. A politically connected millionaire, now running for Virginia governor, wanted to make some money. And a Rhode Island estate planner wantd to become ambassador to the Vatican.

``All three came together in late 2006 in a deal struck just two months before the 44-year old mechanic died of cancer.''

Sue Stenhouse, a well-connected veteran of local GOP politics, is set to join Cranston Mayor Allan Fung's administration as Fung prepares to launch his Republican run for governor next week.

Fung faces a primary challenge from Moderate-turned-Republican Ken Block.

According to an agenda for a Monday evening meeting of the Cranston City Council, Stenhouse is due to be appointed as the city's director of senior services.

It looks increasingly likely that Moderate Party founder Ken Block will make his second run for governor as a Republican.

In a suggestion that he's leaning toward becoming a Republican, Block is downplaying early GOP support for Cranston Mayor Allan Fung.

"Early support, it's sort of fleeting," says Block. He says he's decided on the party affiliation he'll use in making his second run for governor, but declined to specify it in advance of an upcoming announcement "soon."

There is one element of the U.S. Congress that  government shutdowns, fiscal Thelma and Louise threats, and the endless disputes over Obamacare never seem to touch: the relentless search for campaign money by senators and representatives.

The latest Rhode Island example is 1st District Democratic Congressman David Cicilline. The ink was barely dry on the eleventh-hour deal that delayed the shutdown craziness for 90 days or so when Cicilline was on the Internet, begging for campaign money.