Rhode Island College

Elisabeth Harrison

Starting in 2018, state colleges and universities will have to meet specific performance goals to receive increases in state funding, under a state law signed by Governor Gina Raimondo on Thursday.

The goals include increasing the number of students graduating on-time and adding graduates in fields that employers need. 

RIPR FILE

As students enjoy the last few weeks of summer vacation, faculty at Rhode Island College are gearing up for a new semester and a new president. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island, including stories about addiction treatment, intellectual disabilities, medical marijuana, outdoor recreation, antibiotic resistance, and more:

RIPR

Rhode Island College will offer the state’s first undergraduate certificate for students with intellectual disabilities. 

RIPR FILE

Members of the Rhode Island College community are coming together to discuss the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two black men killed by police officers, and the five officers who died in Dallas last week.

The school’s Unity Center will host the conversation on Tuesday and Wednesday. Center Director Antoinette Gomes said the center is a safe space for students, faculty, administrators, and staff to support one another.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Scientists are still working to understand all of the factors behind massive die-offs of honeybees in what’s known as “colony collapse disorder.”

Roger Williams University, Rhode Island College and Providence College hold commencement exercises this weekend, the start of several weekends honoring the class of 2016.

Providence College graduates will hear from Marathon Bombing survivor Heather Abbott at a ceremony at the Dunkin Donuts Center on Sunday. At Roger Williams, commencement exercises begin Saturday morning at the seaside campus in Bristol.

RIPR FILE

Higher ed officials have tapped Frank Sánchez, vice chancellor for student affairs at City University of New York, as the next president of Rhode Island College. He will succeed RIC President Nancy Carriuolo to become the the 10th president of Rhode Island's oldest public college.

Sánchez was one of four finalists for the top post at RIC.

“While it was a difficult decision, we selected Dr. Sánchez because of his commitment to students," said Bill Foulkes, chair of the Council on Postsecondary Education and head of the presidential search committee.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island's Council on Postsecondary Education has scheduled a special meeting Wednesday, listing "Appointment of the new president of Rhode Island College" as an action item. The notice comes in advance of a full state Board of Education meeting, scheduled for next week.

The council is seeking a replacement for outgoing President Nancy Carriuolo, who resigns this month. 

RIPR FILE

Clarke Greene, the current interim Vice President for Advancement and External Relations, will now serve as the interim college president. Greene’s interim position was approved by the state Council on Postsecondary Education.

Katherine Doherty / RIPR

Thousands of Rhode Island high school students are now earning college credits without stepping foot onto a university campus. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Richard Culatta started on the job this week as Rhode Island's first chief innovation officer. The job represents a homecoming for the 37-year-old South Kingstown native after he most recently worked in senior jobs in the US Department of Education.

Richard Culatta, a former Obama Administration education adviser, has been chosen by Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo as the state’s new  $210,000 a year "chief innovation officer."

Raimondo said Culatta will lead an effort to find better approaches to deliver government services in an efficient manner.

Rhode Island College President Nancy Carriuolo is stepping down from the leadership of Rhode Island’s oldest public institution of higher education. Her resignation takes effect after graduation in May, 2016 and was prompted by a group of current and former RIC employees who questioned her leadership and requested her resignation.

A group of Rhode Island College faculty and staff has sent a strongly-worded letter to state officials, warning that college President Nancy Carriuolo is taking RIC in the wrong direction. The letter comes as the State Council on Post Secondary Education conducts an annual personnel review for Carriuolo.

In the letter, 14 RIC faculty and staff members accuse Carriuolo of mismanaging the college and firing or reassigning employees who disagree with her.  

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