Rhode Island

Narragansett Fishermen Part Of New Photography Exhibit

Nov 28, 2016

The exhibit is now on display at the Fishing Heritage Center in New Bedford. Connecticut-based photographer Markham Starr has dedicated almost a decade to documenting New England’s fishing industry. 

Starr photographed fishermen across New England, and says he took a special interest in the trap fishers of Point Judith in Narragansett.

“It’s an ancient type of fishing,” said Starr. “They’ve been doing it probably 150 years in Rhode Island and other traps like it go back even earlier. But there’s only three practitioners left really because it requires a lot of manpower.”

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Playwright David Mamet is well known for works such as “Glengarry Glen Ross” and “Speed-The-Plow.” But many think “American Buffalo” is his masterpiece. Bill Gale says the Gamm Theater's production is proof of that.

“American Buffalo” was first done in Chicago way back in 1975, that time – if you can believe it -  of no cell phones , no Facebook.  And Twitter? That was something birds in the trees did.

Janet Graham / Creative Commons License

The invasive moths are native to Europe and first appeared in New England around 2004. The females lay their eggs between Thanksgiving and the New Year, and their offspring can cause extensive damage to foliage when they hatch as caterpillars in the spring.

Heather Faubert, a research associate at the University of Rhode Island, said so far there’s only one real way to deal with winter months.  

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

What if you could only eat food grown within a few miles of your home for the next ten days? For most of us, that would mean no bread, no coffee, and no olive oil. A group of 57 Aquidneck Island residents decided to take on the challenge, and Rhode Island Public Radio’s Alex Braunstein joined one of them for lunch at her home in Newport.

RI State Archives / Public Domain

An array of photos and documents now on display at the State Archives chronicles the history of indigenous peoples in Rhode Island.  The area was once home to several Native American tribes, including the Wompanoag and the Narragansett.

The exhibit features early deeds between colonists and the tribes living in the area. One of the deeds gave Aquidneck Island to Roger Williams in a deal with the Narragansett Nation.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo is responding to Monday statehouse demonstration, where more than 100 peopled called for state lawmakers to pledge action against some of the President-elect’s campaign promises. The group known as “Resist Hate RI” delivered a letter Raimondo.

In the letter, the progressive group demands that the Governor, Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, and House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello, protect rights they see as threatened by Donald Trump’s administration. Governor Raimondo responded with a lengthy post on social media.

RIPR FILE

A new report on homeless youth in Rhode Island found at least 172 people between the ages of 18 and 24 using emergency shelters in 2015. The report comes from nonprofit Crossroads, a homeless services provider. Crossroads Director Karen Santilli said it’s difficult to track homeless young people.

“They are couch surfing, they are hanging out with friends, they’re finding places to stay in encampments, that are out, off the shelter system,” said Santilli. “So the fact that 172 came into the shelter system is high, but we know the numbers are higher than that.”

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

If you’re hitting the road this Thanksgiving holiday prepare for some company on the interstate, a lot of it. Nearly 50-million people are expected to travel through the weekend. That’s an uptick of nearly 2 percent in the amount of travelers from last Thanksgiving, according to AAA, and the highest number since 2007. The vast majority will hit the road says AAA Northeast spokesman John Paul

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. 

This week, Dave and Mark speak with Karl Wadensten, President of Vibco Vibrators, based in Wyoming, RI. The company manufactures industrial vibrators, used on large scale constructionand  agriculture projects. Wadensten is also a board member of the Rhode Island Commerce Corp.

John Bender / RIPR

The state is back in court Friday for a hearing as environmental officials battle a scrap metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront. The state is asking a Superior Court judge to declare Rhode Island Recycled Metals in contempt for willfully violating court orders.

RIPR FILE

A new national report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development finds chronic homelessness on the rise in Rhode Island. The state is bucking a slight national decline.

The report found the number of Rhode Island homeless on a given night increased by more than 4 percent over the last year. But the number of families and veterans experiencing homelessness dropped by about 25 and 15 percent respectively.

RIPR FILE

Hundreds of Brown University students walked out of classes Wednesday, shouting “Our existence is resistance,” and “Whose campus? Our campus.”

The protest was one of many popping up on college campuses across the nation, in the wake of Republican Donald Trump’s election as president.

At the University of Rhode Island, students and some faculty held a demonstration earlier this week. At Brown, demonstrators called for the school to provide safe harbor for undocumented immigrants and minority groups who report feeling unsafe after the election.

John Bender / RIPR

The state Board of Elections Wednesday night declined a request to delay the certification of votes in a high-profile legislative race. 

John Bender

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza hosted residents Wednesday night concerned about the future under President-elect Donald Trump. 

RIPR FILE

Students at Rhode Island’s public colleges and university could see a tuition hike next year. The state Board of Education is slated to vote Wednesday on a proposal that would increase the cost of Rhode Island College by about $600 a year. Tuition at the University of Rhode Island would go up by about $900, with larger increases for out-of-state students.

Post-Secondary Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said they need a total of about $30 million more dollars for the coming academic year.

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