Rhode Island

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Donald Trump’s surprise victory has prompted climate ministers from around the world to issue a joint statement about the need for the whole international community, including the United States, to remain committed to the Paris Climate Accords.

Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza talked to a Brown University climate policy expert, who is at this year’s United Nations climate summit in Morocco, to find out how leaders are taking the news.

Marc Birnbach / Americares

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found evidence that more than 1,000 pregnant women in the United States may have been infected with Zika virus this year.

A Rhode Island company has now developed clothing aimed at protecting pregnant women against Zika. The apparel is being distributed at a clinic in El Salvador by Americares, a Connecticut-based non-profit.

John Bender / RIPR

On Veterans Day, residents and elected officials are commemorating their servicemen and women with a variety of ceremonies around the state. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. 

How the changing legality of marijuana affects job searches and employee screenings? That’s the subject of this week’s segment, where Dave and Mark speak with Christine Cunneen, CEO of the firm “Hire Image” of Johnston.

The firm is a provider of background screening, drug testing for businesses, nonprofits, government agencies, and other organizations.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Festival Ballet in Providence concludes its "Up Close on Hope" series of programs on Friday and Saturday nights, with a unique collaboration between choreographer Ty Parmenter and storyteller Valerie Tutson. The pair teamed up to produce an original dance set to the spoken word piece "How We Got the Stars." 

Originally a story told by the Zulu people, Parmenter has created a dance for four dancers choreographed to Tutson's telling of the story. Parmenter and Tutson spoke to Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman about how the piece evolved.

RIPR FILE

On this Veteran’s Day, columnist Bob Kerr shares his experiences as a volunteer driver for veterans. Kerr says it’s the conversations he cherishes, even more than the satisfaction of delivering a vet safely to his or her destination. 

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island’s senior Senator Jack Reed said he’s hopeful that President-elect Donald Trump will be able to work across the aisle with Democratic members of Congress. Trump won on a campaign of fiery rhetoric, leading some to wonder how well he would work with others.

Further, both the executive and legislative branches of government are now Republican led, but Reed said Democrats have been able to work within such a system before.

John Bender / RIPR
  • Polls open at 7 o’clock Tuesday morning for Rhode Island voters in the presidential and local elections. Across the state, polls remain open until 8  p.m.
  • Don’t know where to vote? The secretary of state’s office has a website where you can check. All you need is a home address.
  • If you forgot to register to vote, you can still cast a ballot for president.
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Two polling precinct areas in Rhode Island will be part of the federal Department Of Justice’s effort to enforce voting rights laws. The agency plans to deploy some 500 workers in 28 states across the U.S. to make sure elections are run fairly. Federal workers are set to monitor polls in Providence and Pawtucket.

The monitors are tasked with helping protect against fraud, as well as incidents of voter harassment or intimidation.

John Bender / RIPR

Over the last few months we’ve brought you our series “Speaking Across Difference,” the stories of Rhode Islanders bridging divides of religion, socio-economic status and more.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The environmental nonprofit presented awards to distinguished naturalists in the Rhode Island Saturday. It’s how the nonprofit is wrapping its celebration of Natural History Week, says Executive Director David Gregg.

Gregg said Rhode Island will begin to see things in nature that we’ve never seen before.

“In order what they mean and what their implications are, we have to go out there and look at stuff,” said Gregg. “We can’t assume that things in the past are going to be the same in the future.”

John Bender / RIPR

Proponents of the law say it reduces the possibility of voter fraud. Critics of voter ID laws across the country have said they unfairly discriminate against minority communities and the elderly; those who may not have ready access to an ID.

John Marion of the good government non-profit Common Cause Rhode Island says his organization will be watching the election closely.

State of Rhode Island

State leaders are touting their support for a $27 million bond for the construction of a new state veteran’s home. The Bristol home will serve more than 200 elderly veterans.

Voters approved a$ 94 million bond for the home in 2012, but costs swelled as the state worked to comply with federal guidelines. If the bond is approved, the state will spend less money than originally budgeted for the project, due to federal matching funds.

State department of Veterans Affairs spokesman Michael Jolin said the new home will provide both medical care and shelter.

WPRI-TV

Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and his Republican rival, Steven Frias, squared off during a televised debate Friday. Cranston voters will pick between the two candidates on Tuesday.

Mattiello and Frias fought on a series of issues during the 30-minute debate on WPRI-TV, Channel 12. Mattiello says tax cuts he’s supported have moved up Rhode Island about seven ranks from the bottom in a national business survey. Frias responded by saying that’s like going from an F grade to an F-minus.

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