Rhode Island

John Bender / RIPR

One week since the fierce storms that ripped through the state, Rhode Island is in for some more wet weather. Storms are expected to begin Tuesday morning. National Weather Service meteorologist Alan Dunham said there will be a brief reprieve in the late morning.

“We’ll get a bit of a break as a warm front comes through, but then late during the afternoon into the evening we’ll have another round of showers and thunderstorms as a cold front moves over the region,” said Dunham.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Kelly Ramirez, the CEO of the Social Enterprise Greenhouse, a local business-incubator, for socially minded businesses. The group just won a national competition for their work with start-ups. Since its inception five years ago, the group has worked with 65 business. SE Greenhouse recently partnered with Brown University.


When to listen:

Military's Tallest Ship Arrives In Newport

Aug 7, 2015

The tallest ship in the U.S. military arrives Friday in Newport.  The Coast Guard cutter, “The Eagle,” is 295 feet in length and uses more than 6 miles of rigging. For over 60 years, the sailing vessel has served as a classroom for future Coast Guard officers.

Michael Thompson is stationed with the U.S. Coast Guard in Newport. He will be assisting with public tours of the ship this weekend.

John Bender / RIPR

Upper Narragansett Bay is cleaner than it used to be. That’s according to the latest data from the Narragansett Bay Commission.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island’s New Education Commissioner Ken Wagner started work this week with a visit to a public school in Providence. He stopped by Rhode Island Public Radio to talk about test scores and the state of Rhode Island Public Schools with Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you. news@ripr.org

John Bender

More than two days after thunderstorms brought down trees and power lines in Rhode Island, some 3,000  homes and businesses are still without power, many in the Cranston and Warwick area. Hundreds also remain without power along the southern coast near Westerly and Charlestown, according to National Grid's website.

Kenneth C. Zirkel / Wikimedia Commons

The Providence Athenaeum has appointed a new executive director. Matt Burriesci comes to the non-profit following work with the director of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs and the PEN/Faulkner Foundation. He’s also the author of two books, including one novel.

The Providence Athenaeum is an independent library and cultural center, founded in 1836.

Burresci and his family will move to Providence this month from the Washington D.C. area. He begins his tenure at the library and cultural center on September first.

The state health department is waiting to confirm a case of the measles. An infant in Barrington may have contracted the virus before receiving the vaccine.   Other children in a daycare setting may also have been exposed to the virus.

Ian Donnis

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung’s response to a police controversy could damage his political prospects, according to Brown University political science professor Wendy Schiller. Schiller said it will take time for the fallout to settle from a state police report, which alleges the mayor interfered in the Cranston Police Department.

Mayor Fung has declined, at least for now, to release the report, pointing to confidentiality issues. Schiller said that could be a mistake.

It’s been a little more than a year since Rhode Island signed an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to stop segregating and underpaying developmentally disabled workers. Fulfilling the terms of that agreement remain a work in progress.


Fifty years ago this week, on July 25, 1965, a young folk singer named Bob Dylan took the stage at the Newport Folk Festival and transformed himself from a defender of the folk tradition into a leader of a new breed of popular musician, the rock and roll troubadour.

This year’s Newport Folk festival kicks off Friday, and it will include a tribute to this moment in rock and roll history.  Rhode Island Public Radio host Chuck Hinman asked  Newport Folk Festival Founder George Wein to remember the iconic performance.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Three senior transportation officials have been placed on administrative leave, but it has nothing to do with the sudden closure of the Park Avenue Bridge in Cranston, according to Governor Gina Raimondo.

Rhode Island’s ranking for child well-being has dropped from last year, according to a new report from the child advocacy group Kids Count. 

RI State Archives

Governor Gina Raimondo recently announced the state would launch a new $5 million dollar tourism ad campaign. The ad agency hasn’t been chosen yet…but Rhode Island Public Radio decided...why wait? We asked you to come up with a new slogan for the Ocean State. Then we culled our three favorites, and asked you to pick the winner.

The results are in.  The winning slogan, "The biggest moments are made in the smallest state," comes from Frankie B. Washington, a freelance illustrator living in Cranston.

Rhode Island’s Senator Sheldon Whitehouse is sounding celebratory notes following the Senate’s approval of a new education policy. The vote significantly revamps the Bush-era No Child Left Behind Act.

The Senate passed the new education bill by lopsided 81 to 17 vote.

Whitehouse said the new legislation maintains annual testing requirements, but removes some of the penalties for lower performing schools.

Whitehouse, who helped to draft the legislation, says he heard the concerns of many students and teachers about the impact of No Child Left Behind.