Rhode Island

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Snow fell across Rhode Island Monday, just days after Friday's storm, which knocked out power to thousands of National Grid customers. The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning until 7 a.m. Tuesday. Many schools canceled  a second day of classes, and municipalities are enforcing parking bans. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former Providence mayor Buddy Cianci was eulogized Monday after thousands of admirers visited City Hall over the weekend to pay their respects to the man who led the capital city for a total of more than 20 years.

During the funeral service, former mayor Joseph R. Paolino Jr., who served in between the stints known as Buddy I and Buddy II, recalled Cianci as a remarkably skilled politician.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo unveiled a $9 billion budget Tuesday night, touting it as a way to grow Rhode Island's economy while making the state more hospitable to business.

Maggie Hall / Wilbury Theatre Group

Providence’s Wilbury Theatre Group is staging another provocative drama, filled with humor and music. Rhode Island Public Radio’s theater critic Bill Gale, says the show has something to say.

Despite that somewhat sophomoric title, this work eventually turns out to make a point or two. In a snap-fire three act production, in about 2 hours, it manages to take a look at a group of arts-world folks. It peels away the covering, lets us in the audience see their troubles, exterior and internal. And perhaps even offers us a chance to think about our own lives.

albertogp123/flicker

Governor Gina Raimondo has announced a new program to pay for SAT and PSAT testing for public high school 10th and 11th graders.

Governor Gina Raimondo is requesting 500-thousand dollars from the General Assembly, to cover the cost of testing. Currently, students pay $54 to take the SAT and $15 for the PSAT. The SAT, or a similar test, is required to apply to many colleges.

Raimondo said she hopes to encourage more public school students to take the test.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Lawmakers in the Senate and House Finance committees are expected to take up a controversial bill on truck tolls on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively Legislative leaders have proposed a compromise to raise money for road and bridge repairs.

The new bill would cap truck tolls at $20 for a rig crossing the state. It would also cut the number of toll gantries from 17 to 14. And reduce the amount of money the state borrows for road and bridge repairs.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In Providence and in Rhode Island, Buddy Cianci was one of the most influential political figures of his generation, as well as one of the most controversial. His time as Providence mayor was marked by significant economic redevelopment, but also marred by violence, cronyism and corruption.

Chuck Hinman

At the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill in Providence, there is a show called “Pawtucket: A Different Perspective.” It features 520 photos from Pawtucket’s 17th Annual Photo Contest. Contestants were told to hit the streets of the city in search of their particular vision of Pawtucket. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A revised truck toll bill is expected to be introduced in the General Assembly Thursday.

House Majority Leader John DeSimone is expected to introduce the bill in the House, while Senate Majority Leader Dominick Ruggerio will sponsor the bill in the Senate.

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello has signaled his support for hundreds of million dollars fewer borrowing than contained in the original proposal unveiled last year by Governor Gina Raimondo.

Jake Bissaro / The Providence Center

State lawmakers gathered for the signing of the newly reinstated Good Samaritan Overdose Law. The law expired last summer, much to the chagrin of public health advocates.

The law protects people who call 911 for someone who's overdosing from being arrested.

Going forward the law will protect people from being charged for drug possession or use, and from being picked up for violating probation.

Lawmakers put an expiration date on the original bill passed in 2012 in case it conflicted with law enforcement.

RIPR FILE

  Advocates for the homeless say Providence Police unfairly target the homeless residents in downtown Providence. In a recent survey of 100 people milling around Kennedy Plaza in the heart of downtown Providence, about half were homeless or had experienced homelessness.

A survey of 100 people in Kennedy plaza found that roughly 95 percent of those who had experienced homelessness had also been ticketed or arrested by police.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A state Senate report says the need to lower carbon emissions offers an opportunity to expand green jobs. The report says green jobs are already a growing sector of the state economy, having increased by more than 6 percent in recent years.

The Senate report outlines a series of recommendations to add more green jobs, include creating workforce training programs, increasing sources of renewable energy, and strengthening the state’s solar industry.

Chuck Hinman

About half of Block Island remained without power as of late Sunday morning due to the winter storm, which pummeled the island with wind gusts up to 75 miles per hour. Block Island also received the most snow  in the state at 13 inches.

Block Island Power Company CEO Cliff McGinnes said two crews were working to restore primary power lines, and more help was on the way.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island has yet another study on what ails our state’s economy, this time from the Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C. think-tank. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what it will take to translate this plan into action.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Testimony is slated to be heard during a session Friday, related to the state’s lawsuit over 38 Studios.

One of the defendants being sued by the state, Wells Fargo Securities, is trying to obtain the SEC testimony of Michael Saul. Saul is a former deputy director of the state’s economic development agency.

Pages