RI beaches

The annual Governor’s Bay Day is back, with free parking at Rhode Island’s state beaches on Sunday July 26th.

The day includes family-friendly attractions, including free beach parking, free saltwater fishing without a license and free Rhode Island Public Transit Authority bus rides  on all service to South County beaches on the Route 66 bus (the URI/Galilee route).

``Celebrating Governor’s Bay Day is a chance for all Rhode Islanders to enjoy our great beaches and parks,’’ said Gov. Gina Raimondo in a statement.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The National Weather Service has issued a warning about dangerously strong rip-currents, also known as undertows. The hazardous surf is a leftover from the weekend’s stormy weather.

The storms on land may have quieted, but the water offshore is still dangerous, according to the National Weather Service. Rough surf has caused stronger-than average rip-currents.

Weather Service meteorologist Kimberly Buttrick said it typically takes one to two days for the coastal waters to calm after heavy rains.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The nonprofit Ocean Conservancy mobilizes an international beach cleanup each year. The results from the most recent cleanup are in. 

In Rhode Island, volunteers collected more than 16,000 pounds of trash along 59 miles of the state’s shoreline last September. Save the Bay’s July Lewis says the number one item is always cigarette butts.

Wikimedia Commons

Once again, Rhode Islanders are making national news for the low regard we have for our tiny state. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it’s time to stop taking Rhode Island  for granted.

The Gallup poll discovered that Rhode Island is the state least appreciated by its own residents. Just 18 percent of Rhode Islanders said our small slice of southeastern New England was the best place or one of the best places to live.

Once again, Rhode Island has embarked on an advertising campaign to raise our state’s flagging self-esteem. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says its time for us to stop running down our tiny corner of New England.

Back in 1996, when Jack Reed was waging his first U.S. Senate campaign, Texas Gov. Ann Richards came to Newport to speak at a Reed fund-raiser. The tall and tart-tongued Texan introduced the vertically-challenged Rhode Island Democrat by saying to prolonged laughter that Reed is proof ``that size doesn’t matter.’’

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