sailing

John Bender / RIPR

The first man to sail non-stop around the world by himself (in 1968) is in Newport this week preparing for the Transatlantic Ocean Race, which kicks off this weekend.

Now at age 76, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston is skippering is one of nearly 40 teams participating in the 3,000 nautical mile race from Newport to Cornwall England. He sat down with Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender on his boat in Newport harbor to talk about his life-long career in sailing.

More than forty sailboats are getting ready to compete in the historic Transatlantic Ocean Race in Newport. The official start of the race is this weekend.

The race stretches from Newport to South Cornwall, the southernmost point in England. The event is considered a classic competition, the first Transatlantic Race set off from Newport in 1866.

This year’s competitors include Sir Robert Knox-Johnston, the first man to sail solo around the world without stopping. At 76, Knox-Johnston says he thinks he’s got a good shot at success thanks to a strong team.

Ainhoa Sanchez / Volvo Ocean Race

The six teams competing in the international Volvo Ocean Race departed Newport Sunday.It's the last time the sailors will see land until they reach Lisbon, Portugal.

Thousands of people turned up to Fort Adams in Newport, Sunday to see the crews off.  The City by the Sea has played host to the Volvo Ocean Race for the last week and a half.  It’s the only stopover city in the U.S. and North America.

Festivities in Newport surrounding the Volvo Ocean Race are not the only significant sailing activities in Rhode Island waters on Saturday.

Roger Williams University in Bristol will cut the ribbon on its new $3 million sailing center in conjunction with the 11th Annual Captain’s Cup, a regatta featuring current RWU sailors, alumni sailors and their parents.

Kristi Wilson / Team Alvimedica

The international sailing world is on display in Newport, as teams from the Volvo Ocean Race make their only North American stop in the City by the Sea. The next week of events is expected to generate millions of dollars and draw thousands of tourists.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender headed down to Newport to see what all the fuss is about.

In the dead of night on Thursday, a chilly air settled over Fort Adams State Park. A crowd of 7,000 excited spectators thronged the lawn, waiting to catch a glimpse of the boats arriving in the Volvo Ocean Race.

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