same sex marriage

RIPR

Gay rights activists are asking how to re-focus their movement now that same-sex marriage is legal across the country. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Emily Wooldridge spoke with several Ocean State resident to find out what they think. She filed this audio postcard with the voices of Newport native Rodney Davis and his partner Brian Mills, Anthony Masselli and Providence Wendy Becker and her 12-year-old son.

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island’s gay and lesbian community is weighing in on the Supreme Court ruling in favor of nation-wide same-sex marriage. Many see it as an affirmation of the state’s same-sex marriage law.

Sandra Richard joined the local chapter of the lesbian, gay and transgender advocacy group known as PFLAG back in 2010. Her daughter is transgender and married to a woman. At the time, Rhode Island was still three years away from same-sex marriage. 

Rhode Island lawmakers voted to allow same–sex marriage in 2013, but Richard says the Supreme Court decision is still important.

RIPR file photo

Gay rights groups in Rhode Island say the pending Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage could have local impact. The court is considering a landmark case that may determine whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right.

Rhode Island already recognizes same-sex marriage, but Sandra Richards, president of the local chapter of the LGBTQ support group known as PFLAG, says she is still looking for the high court to weigh in.

"There are a lot of implications to marriage equality that affect the daily lives of everyone, even just traveling," Richards said.

Cade Tompkins Projects

Lincoln Chafee’s announcement that he is seriously considering a campaign for the 2016 Democratic presidential  nomination brings to mind sports broadcaster Al Michaels’ famous call from the USA hockey team’s upset victory over the USSR in the 1980 winter Olympics: Do you Believe in Miracles?

That’s pretty much what is would take for Chafee to move into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in January 2017.

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island has a religious freedom law that bears some similarity to an Indiana proposal, that is now raising controversy around the country. Rhode Island’s law drew little criticism when it passed more than 20 years ago.

Rhode Island ACLU director Steve Brown said Rhode Island’s religious freedom law was passed with broad support in the early 1990s. Brown said the law was a response to a US Supreme Court decision denying the right of Native Americans to use peyote in religious ceremonies.

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