John Bender / RIPR

Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders have applied to vote by mail in the presidential election, up from roughly 23,000 in 2012. Those numbers from the office of Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea. Mail-in ballots are counted on Election Night. Gorbea says local boards of canvassers help to guard against vote fraud.

“The mail ballot comes in and is reviewed by the local boards of canvassers and if there are any kinds of discrepancies that seem to trigger a concern, they’re taken up by the state Board of Elections,” said Gorbea.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence's Ward 14 City Councilor, David Salvatore (Elmhurst, Wanskuck) joins Political Roundtable to discuss the debate around the city's $40 million infrastructure bond; the effort to recall Ward 3 Councilor Kevin Jackson; and whether he has any concerns on voting integrity.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea hosted a roundtable Thursday to address questions about cyber security and voter fraud.

Jill Kaufman / NEPR/NENC

Louisiana and Texas permitted early voting in 1921. It’s a slow moving trend, but it’s definitely taking hold. Thirty-seven states now provide some kind of opportunity for registered voters to cast ballots before Election Day. Massachusetts is the newest kid on the block with in-person early voting starting Monday, October 24.

In Springfield, Massachusetts, the city’s election commissioner, Gladys Oyola, said she’s been preparing for “the election before the election” since 2014, when then-Governor Deval Patrick signed early voting into Massachusetts law.

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Bonus Q&A to talk about lobbying reform, Voter ID, public records, and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss whether the state is ready for the presidential primary on Tuesday

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Bonus Q&A this week to discuss how the General Assembly impasse in June affected one of her legislative priorities; why her lobbying proposal didn't win approval; what she can do increase legislative transparency; and more. For more Gorbea, check her appearance on this week's Political Roundtable.

RIPR file photo


Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss a new study on the economic impact of truck tolls; whether her office can do more to police lobbying; and whether a new state contract for daycare workers should concern taxpayers.

The time for raking snow from the roof has given way to the delights of spring and inevitable complaints about heat and humidity. The General Assembly session is headed to busier times and other big issues are simmering. So thanks for stopping by. Feel free to drop me comments and tips at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters.


Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea has unveiled legislation aimed at reforming Rhode Island’s voting laws. Gorbea promised to modernize the voting system during her campaign.

The proposed legislation brings online voter registration to Rhode Island. Residents would enter a database that can be updated when people move out of town or out of state. Gorbea said that would reduce redundancies in the voter rolls.

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Bonus Q+A to talk about whether mail ballots are too easily obtained, what steps should be taken to increase disclosure by lobbyists, how to better encourage voting participation, and more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea joins Political Roundtable to talk about what needs to be done to improve lobbying oversight; whether she'll move to oppose Voter ID; her reaction to President Obama's State of the Union address; and more.

Rhode Islanders Registering To Vote At CCRI

Sep 23, 2014

Secretary of State Ralph Mollis will join the Board of Elections and the Community College of Rhode Island today to register Rhode Island voters. The registration will occur between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at all four of CCRI's locations across the state. Mollis says because of efforts like this, more people are registering to vote than ever.

Joe O'Connor / RIPR

Major races are expected to be decided today, as Rhode Island holds a primary. The Democratic and Republican gubernatorial races top the ballot.  Voter turnout is expected to be decent.

Strong, that is, for a primary election, which, historically, has far lower turnout than the general election held in November. For Rhode Island that means only about twenty percent of register voters are expected to go to the polls.  That’s roughly one-hundred forty thousand people. But Secretary of state Ralph Mollis said there’s a chance turnout could be a little better this year.

Sec. Of State Mollis Unveils Voter Information Phone App

Aug 25, 2014
RIPR FILE / RI Secretary of State's Office

The office of Secretary of State Ralph Mollis has announced a new cell phone application for Rhode Island voters. The free app is called Rhode Island VIC, which stands for "Voter Information Center." It allows citizens to determine their voter status, district information, and closest polling place. Mollis said the app is user-friendly and should be accessible for voters of all ages.

"It's not age-specific. I think more and more people are using this, and we're here to help," said Mollis, "and hopefully this makes their voting experience that much easier."