weather

Chuck Hinman

About half of Block Island remained without power as of late Sunday morning due to the winter storm, which pummeled the island with wind gusts up to 75 miles per hour. Block Island also received the most snow  in the state at 13 inches.

Block Island Power Company CEO Cliff McGinnes said two crews were working to restore primary power lines, and more help was on the way.

New York Times Video

Some of this December's unseasonably warm weather was blamed on a weather event known as El Nino. Essentially, warm air  in the Pacific is carried eastward warming temperatures in some areas, and cooling other parts of the country down. 

The New York Times took a crack at explaining the phenomena with a handy video, made last year, when similarly warm weather struck the region.

John Bender / RIPR

Seasonable winter weather is finally hitting the Ocean State. Temperatures are expected to hover in the thirties today, and snow is expected Monday night.

Flurries are predicted to start late in the evening and continue falling into early Tuesday morning. The northwestern part of the state could see up three inches of snow.

National Weather Service meteorologist Matthew Belk said some parts of the state will have a lot more to shovel than others.

RIPR

If you’ve stepped outside at all this month, you already know the weather has been far from frightful.  Forecasters are predicting a record-breaking Christmas, and the city’s warmest December.

In Providence, Christmas set a record last year at 63 degrees. Meteorologists believe we’ll approach that record this year, and maybe even beat it. Overall this is shaping up to be the warmest December on record in Providence, with an average temperature of 43 degrees.

RIPR FILE

High temperatures in Providence broke several records over the last two days, and meteorologists say White Christmas is exceedingly unlikely.

Around 11 p.m. Monday night, the mercury hit 61 degrees to beat out a record for that date of 59 degrees set in 1991.

Just a few hours later, at 4 a.m. Tuesday morning, temperatures climbed even higher, reaching 64 degrees. That was two degrees warmer than the record. It was even warmer than the same early morning hour this past July 4th.

John Bender / RIPR

Heavy rain may continue on and off through the end of the week, according to forecasters. The National Weather Service issued a hazardous weather outlook on Wednesday morning, when downpours caused localized flooding.

Meteorologist Bill Simpson said while the rainy weather will last through the weekend, the heaviest downpours may let up.

“This is not constant heavy rain like we’re experiencing now, but again, we’re talking about five days,” said Simpson. “Later on Thursday into Friday, and then we’ll see what happens for the weekend.”

Kids may be returning to school, but summer weather is hanging on. Monday is the start of a three-day heat wave.

Temperatures are expected to hit about 90 degrees across the state Monday, before climbing to the mid-nineties Tuesday and Wednesday. National Weather Service meteorologist Frank Nocera said things are predicted to cool off later in the week with clouds and rain.

John Bender / RIPR

As we enter the dog days of summer, even night air offers little respite for from the stifling heat. In Providence, many of the city’s children rely on public pools to stay cool. Last year the Davey Lopes Pool in South Providence reopened following a controversial closure.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender revisits the pool a year later, which many call an anchor of the community.

John Bender / RIPR

One week since the fierce storms that ripped through the state, Rhode Island is in for some more wet weather. Storms are expected to begin Tuesday morning. National Weather Service meteorologist Alan Dunham said there will be a brief reprieve in the late morning.

“We’ll get a bit of a break as a warm front comes through, but then late during the afternoon into the evening we’ll have another round of showers and thunderstorms as a cold front moves over the region,” said Dunham.

John Bender

More than two days after thunderstorms brought down trees and power lines in Rhode Island, some 3,000  homes and businesses are still without power, many in the Cranston and Warwick area. Hundreds also remain without power along the southern coast near Westerly and Charlestown, according to National Grid's website.

A flash flood warning is in effect until Tuesday night for a large swath of Rhode Island. Flooding has already caused trouble in some low-lying areas.

According to the National Weather Service, the greater-Providence area saw three-point-two inches of rain over the weekend, leaving some Cranston roadways underwater. The flooding, mainly in urban areas, included Oaklawn Avenue, where two cars were trapped. Cranston officials say they will deploy public works crews to clean out drains, and monitor the Pawtuxet and Pocasset rivers, which routinely flood.

It’s the first day of Spring, but don’t put away your winter coat just yet.  After a brutal January and February, more snow is predicted today. National Weather Service meteorologist William Babcock said it’s expected to start late this afternoon.

"It could become a factor for the evening commute for parts of the state.  Possibly Providence, better shot in spots like Newport and Westerly," said Babcock.

Rhode Islanders are in for another arctic blast starting Friday.  Temperatures plunged into the single digits, and the National Weather Service says things will only warm up to the high teens through the weekend.

Meteorologist Mathew Belk, said wind chills will make temperatures feel far below zero. “Wind chills are going to be generally in the minus fifteen to minus 24 range, so it’s going to feel pretty chilly out there,” said Belk. 

Yet another winter storm has blanketed Rhode Island in snow.  This weekend saw more than a foot of the white stuff fall in areas including North Providence, Burrilville and Warren.  Residents are now dealing with arctic temperatures.

National Grid has completed installing the last of seven weather stations throughout Rhode Island. This program collects local weather information in real time.

The weather stations are strategically located in Coventry, Bristol, Charlestown, Exeter, Hopkinton, and Little Compton. The town of Westerly has had its weather station for only a couple of weeks, and already it’s proved to be useful, said Amy Grzybowski, the town’s emergency management director.

Pages