west nile virus

First Case Of West Nile Of The Season Found In South County

Aug 21, 2015
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After the discovery of West Nile Virus in a pool of mosquitos in South Kingstown, state officials say the virus is much more widespread. 

  The disease usually causes only mild flu-like symptoms. But, in a small number of cases, it can lead to more serious illness.

Alan Gettman heads the state’s mosquito abatement program.

“Citizens need to think about a report like this as meaning that the virus is established all over the state, and there’s not a hot spot that we’ve detected,” said Gettman.

An Exeter man has been treated for the first human case of West Nile in Rhode Island this year.

The Rhode Island Department of Health said the 33-year-old Exeter man first started developing symptoms on September 11.  Two days later he was at South County Hospital, diagnosed with viral meningitis caused by West Nile Virus. He was released a few days later and is recovering at home.

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Three more mosquito pools have tested positive for West Nile virus. The positive results were from mosquitoes trapped in the Smith Hill area of Providence, in the southern section of East Providence, and in central North Kingstown. All of the mosquitoes were of a species that feeds on birds and mammals.

The Department of Environmental Management says these findings are not unexpected this time of year.

Test results from two mosquito pools in Rhode Island have come back positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis. This is the second time EEE has been confirmed in the state this year.

The samples came from traps set in Tiverton and Westerly.  The Department of Environmental Management says the findings aren’t surprising for this time of year, and it’s likely that EEE is present in other parts of the state.

Furthermore, two mosquito pools in Tiverton and Hopkinton have confirmed positive results for Highlands J Virus, that virus is a bird disease that doesn’t affect humans.

RI Mosquitoes Test Positive for EEE

Sep 5, 2013

For the first time this year, mosquitoes trapped in Rhode Island have tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis, a virus characterized by the sudden onset of  headache, high fever, chills and vomiting.  A second mosquito batch has tested positive for West Nile Virus.

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The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has announced the first finding of West Nile Virus in mosquitoes in the state this year.

The department routinely checks mosquitoes for both West Nile Virus, and Eastern Equine Encephalitis starting in the late spring.

Alan Getman of the DEM said West Nile Virus has been in Rhode Island for twelve years, and today’s reappearance was not unexpected.