winter

John Bender / RIPR

Rhode Islanders will soon get a break from arctic temperatures, but the trade is more snow this week. After several days without a glimpse of the white stuff, the National Weather Service is predicting snowfall will return Tuesday night.  

Meteorologist Alan Dunham said Rhode Island won’t see the foot or more it’s seen in previous storms this winter.  “Maybe two to four inches.  Mainly Providence down towards Newport and points east, but even northwest part of Rhode Island up in the northwest hills could see an inch or two,” said Dunham.

Rhode Islanders are in for another arctic blast starting Friday.  Temperatures plunged into the single digits, and the National Weather Service says things will only warm up to the high teens through the weekend.

Meteorologist Mathew Belk, said wind chills will make temperatures feel far below zero. “Wind chills are going to be generally in the minus fifteen to minus 24 range, so it’s going to feel pretty chilly out there,” said Belk. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Despite the recent stream of bitterly cold temperatures, Rhode Island’s Low Income Heating Assistance Program still has plenty of money for the cold months to come.

Rhode Island received about $27 million dollars in federal assistance to support the program this year.  LIHEAP, as it’s known, helps some 34 thousand households pay for heating costs throughout the winter. 

Yet another winter storm has blanketed Rhode Island in snow.  This weekend saw more than a foot of the white stuff fall in areas including North Providence, Burrilville and Warren.  Residents are now dealing with arctic temperatures.

National Grid has completed installing the last of seven weather stations throughout Rhode Island. This program collects local weather information in real time.

The weather stations are strategically located in Coventry, Bristol, Charlestown, Exeter, Hopkinton, and Little Compton. The town of Westerly has had its weather station for only a couple of weeks, and already it’s proved to be useful, said Amy Grzybowski, the town’s emergency management director.

John Bender / RIPR

The snow is no longer falling, but transportation remains snarled across much of Southern New England.  Public transit has all but shut down in Boston, leaving commuters and others stranded in Providence.

The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority halted all commuter train and Subway service at 7 p.m. Tuesday. That left riders in Rhode Island with few good options except Amtrak trains, and even those are running on a limited schedule.

Rhode Island Emergency Management officials are urging residents to help friends and neighbors dig out after the third snow storm in as many weeks.

State Emergency Management Director Peter Gaynor said everyone needs to pitch to help the state’s most vulnerable residents. "So the elderly, the very young and pets. They don’t have the ability to stand up to really cold temperatures or wind so keep an eye on your neighbor or your parents or your loved ones and make sure that they’re safe during these next couple days."

The latest in a series of snow storms is putting pressure on municipal budgets.  City and town leaders are reacting in different ways. 

In Pawtucket, snow-removal costs have led Mayor Donald Grebien to tell department heads to hold the line on new spending.

Courtesy Save The Bay

Seals from Maine and the Atlantic Provinces of Canada start migrating to Narragansett Bay in October. But February is one of the best months for seal watching in Narragansett Bay. That’s when the number of migrating seals peaks, ranging between 300-500. 

Rhode Islanders have more snow to deal with, as yet another winter storm hits the northeast.  Forecasters are predicting around a foot of snow will fall in Rhode Island by the end of the day Monday. Nearly a foot of snow had already fallen in some areas by 4 p.m. 

Most of the heavy snowfall was concentrated in northern areas including Pawtucket, Cumberland and Providence.  Southern parts of the state, like Newport and Westerly, saw snow totals on the order of 3-5 inches.

Rhode Islanders will face arctic temperatures Friday.  According to the National Weather Service temperatures have been hovering in the single digits, and even hitting zero degrees in some parts of the state. Wind chills will make temperatures feel well below zero.

Providence Extends School Year, To Make Up For Snow Days

Feb 6, 2015
RIPR FILE

Providence Public Schools have maxed out their snow days.  The district has called 5 snow days, already 2 more than they planned for.  

Spokesperson Christina O’Reilly said the district will have to extend the school year until June 25th.  “At this point we’ve assured families, and staff that February vacation is not going to be on the table,” said Reilly. 

Get ready for extremely cold temperatures.  Rhode Island got a brief reprieve Wednesday, but forecasters say the mercury will start falling Thursday afternoon, and may get down to -4 Fahrenheit through the night.

With the wind chill, possible temperatures could feel as cold as -15.  Snow could also be on the way.  The National Weather Service says there's a chance for snow showers late Thursday morning.  Then they're expecting more of the white stuff possibly as early as Saturday.  Right now, they believe the heaviest snowfall is likely on Sunday and Monday, the 9th.

Deep Freeze Could Make For Messy Commute

Feb 3, 2015
John Bender / RIPR

As Rhode Islanders continue to dig out from Monday’s snow storm, they’ll have to do it in the frigid cold.

Across the state, temperatures are hovering around ten degrees, with wind chills making it well below zero.  National Weather Service meteorologist Frank Nocera said Rhode Island won’t get much a reprieve as the day wears on.  “Despite some sunshine temperatures are only going to get up to 15, 17 degrees, that’s it.  The good news is that the winds will diminish this afternoon,” said Nocera.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo and Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza are getting generally high marks for their response to the blizzard earlier this week.  The state continues to dig out from the major winter storm.

Pages