Local Features

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Many of Rhode Island’s 18th century buildings have survived a number of coastal storms in the past: the Great September Gale of 1815, the 1938 Hurricane, and most recently Superstorm Sandy. 

John Bender / RIPR

As part of our occasional series, Rising Tide, we’re offering snapshots of Rhode Island’s economy after the Great Recession. The state famous for coffee milk syrup, is now home to a burgeoning specialty coffee scene.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Over the years Trinity Rep has made its mark taking new looks at classic plays. This time out it's “To Kill a Mockingbird” that is seen with a fresh perspective. RIPR theater critic Bill Gale says the new take works, but just barely.

    

That's right. Since the days of leadership by Adrian Hall, Trinity has rarely done a show in the usual way. Think of a 1920s car being driven, more or less, through the upstairs theater decades ago. Or remember an onstage abortion, or a veteran actor chopping a chunk of beef, in place of a man.

Cinema Ritrovato

Starting Tuesday, Brown University hosts a unique four-night film festival put on by the Italian Studies Department, in conjunction with the Cineteca, or film library, in Bolgna, Italy. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence freelance writer Phil Eil has been trying for more than four years to use the Freedom of Information Act request to get access to evidence used in a 2011 drug trial in Ohio. The US Justice Department blamed the defendant in the case, Dr. Paul Volkman, for the overdose death of four patients, and he was sentenced to four consecutive life terms in prison. Yet federal officials have refused to release thousands of pages of trial evidence to Eil, a former Providence Phoenix news editor.

Wikimedia Commons

This week marks two holidays honoring St. Patrick and St. Joseph, the patron saints of Irish and Italian-Americans. All of this has RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay thinking about the rich history of Irish and Italian immigration in Rhode Island and the recent debates about new immigrants. 

The Bottom Line: Should RI Tax Carbon Emissions?

Mar 11, 2016

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

Dead Animals: Taxidermy in Art

Mar 10, 2016
Chuck Hinman

Have you given any thought lately to your relationship with animals? Statistics reveal a contradictory interaction between humans and other species.

Here in the United States, the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that there could be as many as 176 million dogs and cats being kept as pets, many of them no doubt treated as beloved members of the family. On the other hand, figures from the Humane Society show billions of cattle, chickens and other livestock slaughtered every year for food.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

An estimated 20 percent of the trash that ends up in landfills is food. One way to reduce food waste is to compost your kitchen scraps. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

There’s a good chance your doctor is working towards creating something called a patient-centered medical home. It’s designed to offer patients more coordination and convenience. But can it make patients healthier?

State Council Of Churches facebook page

Two Syrian refugee families now call Rhode Island home, which had caused fear and outrage for some government officials and community leaders. However, the Ocean State has a long history of resettling refugees and these families and individuals come from all over the world.

John Bender / RIPR

The US Securities & Exchange Commission on Monday announced that it has charged Wells Fargo Securities and the state agency formerly known as the Economic Development Corporation with defrauding investors in the municipal bond offering used to finance 38 Studios in Rhode Island.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The presidential primary campaign is in high gear, but Rhode Island gets scant attention from White House hopefuls. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has some ideas about how we can change this.

In the past Festival Ballet Providence's popular Up Close on Hope series has presented evenings with half-a-dozen, or more, works by various choreographers.  But beginning tonight Up Close will present just two pieces, each taken from classic tales, both world premieres by choreographers familiar to Festival Ballet fans.

One is Venezuelan-born dancer-choreographer,” Gianni Di Marco's view of Marguerite Gautier's  “Lady of the Camellias,” a romantic idle, looking at love, and eventual death. 

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Pawtucket's Gamm Theatre is currently doing the Irish play “A Skull in Connemara.” It's a work infrequently done, certainly not as often as playwright Martin McDonagh's best, “The Beauty Queen of Leenane.” Bill Gale thinks he knows the reason why.

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