News

Screenshot of the Audubon Society of Rhode Island's Peregrine Falcon Webcam

The iconic Superman Building may be vacant, but it has no trouble attracting peregrine falcons. The skyscraper’s current residents welcomed four chicks this week.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre

“Anything Goes” is a classic Broadway musical that first appeared in 1934. Now the Ocean State Theatre Company is doing a re-done version from 1987. Bill Gale says the result is pretty darn good – with some reservations.

Let's begin with the good stuff. After all, “Anything Goes” is filled, saturated actually, with the music (and lyrics) of the great Cole Porter. If you are of a certain age, or a person of any age who loves good songs, you get a kick out of this show.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Your Mother

May 3, 2016

  Who hasn't had a close encounter or two with a remarkably exasperating, perhaps eccentric, relative -- that legendary family fixture who has an astonishing ability to push the proverbial envelope and test our patience? And then, as so often happens, this is the relative who, over time, manages somehow to seep into and truly touch our soul. This is what happened to Janine Weisman. 

 

 

Janine Weisman is editor of Mercury, a weekly arts, culture and lifestyle publication in Newport. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Care New England, the parent organization of Women and Infants, Memorial, Butler, and Kent Hospitals, as well as The Providence Center, has announced it’s pursuing a formal alliance with Southcoast Health. The two health systems face several hurdles before their partnership can be official.

The boards of both organizations approved the proposed affiliation today  after announcing its possibility last November. What happens next is a regulatory review process in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, where Southcoast has a chain of community hospitals.

15 delegates, elected during last week's Presidential nominating primary, will head to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia this summer to represent Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The names were announced Tuesday by state Democratic Party chair Joseph McNamara.

Despite Sanders' victory over Clinton by more than 10 percentage points, the just eight delegates will represent the Vermont Senator. Delegates are split proportionally in Rhode Island. Seven delegates will represent former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

  Education officials are backing away from a plan to require test scores for a high school diploma. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

  The Rhode Island Department of Transportation is working to be more transparent, and shrug off a public perception that it’s mired in inefficiency. The agency released its quarterly report Monday.

Director Peter Alviti pointed to efforts including new signage at DOT projects, which signal if they’re running on time and on budget. If all’s well, the sign will be green. If not, it will be yellow or red, depending on the state of the project.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

House Finance Chairman Ray Gallison is set to resign as a state representative Tuesday as he faces a law enforcement probe, RIPR has learned.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A nonprofit that makes nutritional supplements for malnourished children is expanding operations in Rhode Island. Edesia has cut the ribbon on a new 83,000 square-foot manufacturing facility in Quonset Business Park.

Edesia makes packets of what’s called ready-to-use food - essentially a heavily fortified peanut butter meant to treat severe malnutrition in children.

The company says packets were distributed to nearly a million children in 2015, most recently to Syrian refugees and victims of the Ethiopian drought.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Sen. Edward O'Neill, who announced Monday he is not seeking re-election to the state Senate, tells RIPR he is considering a run for state treasurer in 2018. (He later added that he is also contemplating a run for governor.)

O'Neill staged a major upset when he defeated Joseph Montalbano, then the president of the Senate, in 2008. For most of the time since then, O'Neill has served as the only Independent among 38 senators, although he became a Republican earlier this year and won election as a delegate supporting Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

John Bender / RIPR

Performing elephants, a staple of the circus for decades, will no longer be part of the big-top event. The elephants' final performances were Sunday in Providence. The circus announced it would phase out elephant performances as the public voiced more and more opposition to the practice.

The political season keeps zipping along, with the calendar turning toward May. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, you can share your tips and comments, and follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

The Bottom Line: Creating A Culture Of Innovation

Apr 29, 2016

  Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave chat with Richard Culatta, Rhode Island’s first chief innovation officer, appointed in January.

They talk  fostering innovation in government, collaboration with businesses and the public, how to change old thinking about new ideas, and overcoming the “we’ve always done it this way” attitude.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

Josiah Mackenzie/Creative Commons

Street closures are planned in Providence Sunday to make way for the 9th annual Providence marathon. The race starts at 7 a.m. and lasts until roughly 2 p.m.

Despite an early mix-up over race registration, some 3,000 runners are signed up to take part, several hundred more than organizers were expecting. 

Earlier this year, hundreds of runners signed up for the Providence marathon under a company that no longer organizes the race. After legal action, the current organizer was able to honor all registrations.

Folger Shakespeare Library

Time is almost up to see William Shakespeare’s First Folio on display at Brown University this month. As Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, the 17th Century book thought to have save some of Shakespeare’s most beloved plays leaves Providence after the weekend.

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