NPR News

Nearly half of all American adults have been entered into law enforcement facial recognition databases, according to a recent report from Georgetown University's law school. But there are many problems with the accuracy of the technology that could have an impact on a lot of innocent people.

University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing's body camera was on when he pulled over Sam DuBose last year for a missing front license plate. From the footage, it is clear that Tensing is asking DuBose for his driver's license, and DuBose says he doesn't have it.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren ripped into Donald Trump on Hillary Clinton's behalf at a rally in New Hampshire on Monday. Warren was playing the role of a sassy friend with the snark to say the things Clinton either could or would not say.

A few weeks ago, Donald Trump told a New Hampshire crowd he loves to cite the polls — when he is ahead.

"When we do badly, I don't know about polls, right? But when we're doing well, I know about polls," Trump said in Sandown, N.H., on Oct. 6. Since then, Trump has fallen from about 4 points behind Hillary Clinton nationally, to about 6 points. But his positioning in battleground states that will determine which candidate gets to 270 electoral votes has become much more precarious.

Trump is now lashing out against those polls.

The cost of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is expected to rise an average of 22 percent in 2017, according to information released by the Obama administration Monday afternoon.

Still, federal subsidies will also rise, meaning that few people are likely to have to pay the full cost after the rate increases to get insurance coverage.

Next month, there's a world chess championship match in New York City, and the two competitors, the assembled grandmasters, the budding chess prodigies, the older chess fans — everyone paying attention — will know this indisputable fact: A computer could win the match hands down.

They've known as much for almost 20 years — ever since May 11, 1997. On that day, IBM's Deep Blue defeated the great Garry Kasparov who, after an early blunder, resigned in defeat.

Not so very long ago, colonoscopy was the gold standard for colon cancer screening. But times are a-changing. Last month when I went in for a checkup, my primary care doctor handed me a FIT test, a colon cancer test you can do at home without the unpleasantness and risk that turn people off to colonoscopy.

The FIT test, or fecal immunochemical blood test, is a newer and more accurate way to test for blood in stool, which can be a symptom of colon cancer.

Parents can reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome by keeping their child's crib in the same room, close to their bed, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Pennsylvania's former attorney general, Kathleen Kane, has been sentenced to 10 to 23 months in jail after she was embroiled in a scandal that shook the state's political establishment.

The Iraqi military and its allies have been pushing for a week toward the city of Mosul, held by the Islamic State. For people fleeing the fighting, a few thousand so far, it's been an unbelievably frightening seven days.

In the Debaga camp for displaced people, about 50 miles southeast of Mosul, which is becoming more crowded, I sit with a family who tell me about leaving the village where they lived under ISIS more than two years.

There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming. But the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country.

Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts. Wyoming Public Radio’s Stephanie Joyce reports.

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado almost three years ago has given way to an industry of dispensaries, including Native Roots, the largest marijuana chain and license holder in the state.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson met with owner and CEO Josh Ginsberg about how he has seen the industry evolve, and the challenges he continues to face under burdensome regulations.

Remembering Activist And Author Tom Hayden

13 hours ago

The author, journalist, politician and one of the organizers of the anti-war protests at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, died yesterday in California. He was 76.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young had a chance to speak with Hayden at the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this summer. He had suffered a stroke and was in a wheelchair.

But while his body was failing him, his mind was not — Hayden was still speaking out. Today, we’re revisiting that conversation, which aired in July.

New research finds little lies pave the way for big ones.

It's one thing to appreciate a 20-year-old fine wine. It is something else to brew up a 2,500-year-old alcoholic beverage.

While sifting through the remains of an Iron Age burial plot dating from 400 to 450 B.C. in what is today Germany, Bettina Arnold, an archaeologist and anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and others uncovered a cauldron that contained remnants of an alcohol brewed and buried with the deceased.