Manuel C. Correira

Bristol Marks 230th Independence Day Festivities

Organizers believe Bristol has the longest running, continuous 4th of July celebration in the country. It began as what are called "patriotic exercises" in 1785. The parade likely started in the 1800’s. This year’s Chief Marshall, State Representative Raymond Gallison, Jr., has attended the event every year since 1974. In all those years, he missed the parade just once, in 1978, the year he got married.
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Taylor.a

RI's Newest Charter School Set To Open In Woonsocket

The newest mayoral charter school set to open in Rhode Island has picked a location in downtown Woonsocket. RISE Prep will start with a kindergarten class this fall and grow to include a middle school. This will be the first charter elementary school in Woonsocket.
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Work is the fulcrum of social mobility in our country. In Rhode Island, lawmakers have approved an increase in the minimum wage. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says that falls far short of what’s needed to help the working poor.

Democrats claim to be the party of working people. Come campaign season, Democratic candidates boast at every turn that they care about ``working families’’ more than Republicans, the party Democrats brand as the tool of the rich and the one-percent.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss how the legislative session ended with an impasse between the House and the Senate; whether the Senate will return for a special session; and the outlook for Governor Raimondo's truck-toll plan.

Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss the fallout from last week's legislative impasse, as well as a host of other issues, including charter schools, the PawSox, her political future, and much more.

Governor Gina Raimondo has selected Colonel Christopher P. Callahan as the new Adjutant General of Rhode Island and the Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard.

Callahan will replace Major General Kevin McBride, who retired in June. Raimondo describes him as an experienced serviceman after 25 years and various positions in the National Guard.

Welcome to July and a brief respite from politics. Happy Fourth of July to all my readers, and thanks for stopping by. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome, and you find follow me through the week on the twitters. A quick program note: I'm embarking on summer vacation, so TGIF will be on hiatus until July 24.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave chat with Sally Lapides, president and CEO of Residential Properties Limited of Providence. Lapides says the high-end real estate market is picking back up after the Great Recession, but there are new trends among buyers, and the internet is changing the relationship between realtors and their clients.

RIPR FILE

Providence Fire Chief  Clarence A. Cunha is retiring after almost 35 years with the capital city’s fire department.

Cunha has reached the mandatory retirement age of 60. His retirement is not related to the ongoing negotiations between the union representing firefighters and the administration of Mayor Jorge Elorza, said mayoral spokesman Evan England.

``This didn’t come as a surprise,’’ said England. ``It is not related to the platoon talks.’’

Elorza said in a statement that Assistant Chief Scott Mello will take over as chief on an interim basis.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin

Rhode Island’s Attorney General has issued guidance for law enforcement after the expiration of the Good Samaritan law. The law was created to protect people from drug charges if they call 911 about a drug overdose; it expired July 1st after lawmakers took no action to extend it before adjourning for the summer.

Emily Wooldridge / RIPR

The Rt. Rev. Nicholas Knisely, Rhode Island’s Episcopal Bishop, voted in favor of a resolution approved by the Episcopal  Church’s highest governing body, that issued a strong statement that marriage should be available to ``straight, gay and lesbian couples equally across the church.’’

``This has been the practice in Rhode Island since very soon after I was consecrated bishop in 2012,’’ Knisely said in a statement.

The resolution was approved at a meeting of the church's leaders at a meeting in Salt Lake City.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State lawmakers introduced a bill requiring Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, in all middle and high schools. But the legislation never made it past a House committee.

Leaving that legislation on the table could have consequences.

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