Kristin Gourlay

State Police Report Blasts Fung, Cranston Police Brass

The state police report released Monday on the Cranston police department portrays a law-enforcement force in disarray and infected with dysfunction and political favoritism, including serious failures by Mayor Alan Fung, the Republican candidate for governor in 2014, and members of his administration. The former police chief, Col. Marco Palombo, is depicted as a bully who, one officer told state police, ran the department ``like the Mafia. You are either with them or you’re doomed.’’ It was...
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Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence Firefighters' Union Asking Judge to Vacate Pension Settlement

The Providence firefighters’ union said it plans on Monday to ask a judge to vacate the city’s landmark 2013 pension settlement with public safety unions. Paul Doughty, president of the International Association of Firefighters, Local 799, said the request is a response to a legal maneuver last week in which the city argued Local 799's current contract is void and unenforceable. The fire union and Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza are fighting in court over the mayor’s implementation over the...
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  Thank goodness for a new week. Could last week have been any worse for Boston sports?

Don Borman

Rhode Island House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello said Monday he's hopeful an agreement will emerge in the near future for a plan to build a new PawSox stadium in downtown Providence.

"Since I don't have a finalized set of terms at this point, I can't predict," Mattiello said. "But in the near future. I would like to see something come out within the next few weeks, several weeks."

Mattiello said the intention is to arrive at an agreement for a revenue-neutral proposal and solicit feedback from the public.

Kristin Gourlay

  The state police report  released Monday on the Cranston police department portrays a law-enforcement  force in disarray and infected with dysfunction and political favoritism, including serious failures by Mayor Alan Fung, the Republican candidate for governor in 2014, and members of his administration.

Photo Courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island may mount a research expedition to the most active underwater volcano in the Caribbean Sea. Disaster management authorities there have been on alert for more than a week. Earthquakes have been recorded around the area of the volcano known as Kick’Em Jenny off the coast of the island of Grenada, indicating a potential eruption. 

The 19th annual Rhode Island International Film Festival kicks off Tuesday. Judges sifted through more than 5,700 entries to winnow down this year’s festival  to 250 films.  The films will be screened at a dozen venues across the state.

Executive Director George Marshall said after nearly two decades the festival is gaining international recognition.

“Things are starting to coalesce with folks internationally discovering who we are as an organization and as point of exhibition for quality films that reflect filmmakers’ visions from across the world,” said Marshall.

Happy Friday, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. There's plenty of news, even in the peak of summer, so we're ready to dive in. Your tips and thoughts remain welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Steve Wood

Rhode Island’s Land Trust Council is inviting the public to enjoy all of the green space the environmental coalition has preserved over the years. Organizers have planned more than 50 outdoor events across the state, starting with a walk Friday night in Bristol to admire the rare blue moon.

Rhode Island Land Trust Director, Rupert Friday said the events known as “Land Trust Days” provide a chance to unplug and reconnect with nature. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave ask Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza about the city's decision to remove pension investments from a group of greenhouse gas-producing companies.

August is high-alert month for the Asian Longhorned beetle.  The invasive species can cause extensive damage to forested areas and has been found as close as Boston.In Worcester, the beetle was responsible for destroying some 34,000 trees.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is asking Rhode Islanders to check local trees for dime-sized holes  and dead branches that indicate the presence of the beetle.

"You could also see shallow chew marks in the bark where the beetle would lay eggs," said U.S.D.A. spokesman Elvis Cordova.

Rhode Island has been given the green light for a pilot program to coordinate health care for people enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid. They're known as “dual eligibles” and have to navigate two complex systems to get the care they need.

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