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Court Documents On 38 Studios to Be Released; Timing Unclear

All the currently sealed court documents in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios will be made public, Judge Michael Silverstein said Friday, although the timing of the release remains unclear for now. During a status hearing, Silverstein said lawyers in the case agreed to the unsealing of documents since discovery has been completed.
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Newport Historical Society

Remembering The Stamp Act Riots

Dozens of historical re-enactors gather in Newport Saturday to mark the 250th anniversary of the Stamp Act Riots, which were among the early rumblings of the Revolutionary War. Taking their lead from rebels in Massachusetts, a group of Newport residents rioted in 1765 against the Stamp Act. The legislation, approved in England, levied a new import tax on the colony.
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Newport Historical Society

Dozens of historical reenactors gather in Newport Saturday to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Stamp Act Riots. The events were some of the first rumblings of the Revolutionary War.

In 1765, a group of Newporters, taking their lead from rebels in Massachusetts, rioted against the Stamp Act. The legislation would have levied a new tax on the colonists. It was approved in England, over the colony’s objections.

Westerly residents are asking the town council to drop or modify a consent agreement it signed last year with the owner and tenants of a controversial quarry. 

A summer slowdown of news? Rhode Island's summer of 2015 will likely be remembered for two important releases of information -- the State Police report on Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, and, more significantly, the unsealing of documents in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios. As always, feel free to drop me a tip or your comments, and to follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Students head to classrooms this week in the annual back-to-school ritual. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this should be the year our public schools embrace teaching history and civics.

From Providence to Pasadena, history teaching in our public schools is in a sorry state. A study  by the Rhode Island Historical Society shows that despite the need for for students to know more about the past, history education is getting short shrift in the classrooms.

Charges will mostly likely be dismissed for two climate activists, who were arrested earlier this month in Burrillville. They chained themselves to the front gate of a Spectra Energy facility to protest plans for an expansion.

A status hearing in the state’s lawsuit over the failure of video game company 38 Studios is slated for Friday. The topics will include a proposed settlement involving some of the defendants.

The state announced earlier this month it reached a $12 .5 million settlement with four of the 38 Studios defendants. A judge has to approve the deal for it to go forward.

Some of the defendants who have yet to settle, including former 38 Studios owner Curt Schilling, are objecting to the settlement. The reasons for that have not yet been made public.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s health department canceled a community meeting about the HPV vaccine planned for Thursday at the Middletown Public Library. A department spokeswoman says staff have been threatened online. The department decided to cancel the event after consulting with State Police. 

Rhode Island now requires boys and girls entering seventh grade to get the HPV vaccine to prevent cervical and other kinds of cancers. Some Rhode Islanders have protested the vaccine mandate. They can request an exemption. 

RIPR

Karen Bordeleau, who rose to become The Providence Journal's first female executive editor during a 20-year career at the newspaper, is leaving Fountain Street after slightly more than two years in the post.

From the Annals of Internal Medicine article: Restrictions for Medicaid Reimbursement of Sofosbuvir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the United States / Authors: Soumitri Barua; Robert Greenwald, JD; Jason Grebely, PhD; Gregory J. Dore, MBBS, PhD; Tracy Swan; and Lynn E. Taylor, MD

Hepatitis C may not take as big of a chunk out of the state’s Medicaid budget as previously projected. One reason? A majority of patients who requested treatment have been denied.

taylor.a/creative commons license

The University of Rhode Island has won $500,000 from the National Science Foundation to launch a graduate center focused on science writing.

The program will include workshops and classes to train students in the sciences  to write more clearly and persuasively. University officials said the program is part of a trend on college campuses, as researchers increasingly recognize the importance of communicating beyond academia.

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