Ward 14 Providence Councilor David Salvatore joins Bonus Q&A to talk about city finances, the proposed agreement with city firefighters, whether Providence's influence at the legislature is waning, and other topics.

On a Saturday evening, kids race around a small stage in Roger Williams Memorial Park, fighting for the best patch of grass. Parents lean back on beach chairs as two performers enter with microphones.

“Me and LK have been friends for two or three years now,” said the actor. “We met at children’s school. I got a bad grade because they swapped my test by accident.”

These two friends happen to be a walrus named Alex and a teddy bear named LK. The walrus wears long, felt tusks. The bear’s got fuzzy ears and an AT&T nametag -- he’s a phone sales specialist.

RIPR file photo

Attorneys General from across the eastern United States convene Thursday in Newport. They’re participating in a two-day conference organized by the National Association of Attorneys General.

Amy Kempe from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office says the meeting will focus on making the most of taxpayer money through partnerships.

Yale Publishes Mysterious Medieval Manuscript

22 hours ago
Davis Dunavin / WSHU

It’s one of the world’s great literary mysteries: a 15th century book full of bizarre illustrations of imaginary plants, astrological signs, surreal figures and landscapes. Its origins are unknown, its creator anonymous. And it’s written entirely in an unknown language that’s stumped the world’s greatest code breakers.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won Rhode Island's Democratic primary by more than 10 points, beating rival Hillary Clinton with the help of grass-roots and student-led efforts. But Sanders went on to lose the nomination, leaving his most ardent fans in something of a quandary.

itub / Creative Commons License

The Rhode Island Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday  in two cases related to the long-running conflict over a visitors center proposed for the grounds of The Breakers mansion in Newport. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

At an annual conference by the American Wind Energy Association in Rhode Island, federal officials declared their commitment to speed up the deployment of more offshore wind energy projects.

From the coasts to the Great Lakes, different regions can tap into offshore wind, said Abby Hopper, director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. The nation’s total offshore wind energy potential is equal to about double its demand for electricity. Hopper said the time to pursue offshore wind is now.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The rare New England cottontail rabbit and other shrubland species are getting some new help from the U.S. Fish and wildlife Service. The agency is targeting 15,000 acres of land in six northeastern states, to be included in a new "Great Thickets National wildlife Refuge".

Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Conservationists have kicked off a project this week to shore up thirty acres of salt marsh at the John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge. It’s one of the larger projects underway to make the state’s salt marshes more resistant to climate change.

  Some losses in life seem absolutely unbearable.  The unanticipated end of an intimate relationship that's at the center of our lives.  The death of a parent who can no longer provide advice or answer our phone calls, or, perhaps the most difficult, the death of a young child.  So often, it seems, the language we use in everyday discourse falls far short of what we need when we are in the midst of such profound grief, such unmitigated, seemingly unending despair.  What many of us discover at these times is that we need something other than words, perhaps the silent presence of a close friend, or the gentle reminders that somehow, some way, life will and must go on.  This is just what happened to Abby Dawes. 


Abby Dawes lives in Barrington with her partner, Brian DiSalvo, and their four-year-old son Will.  She is the Head of Regulatory Relations at Citizens Bank.  Dawes wishes to thank the wonderful nurses at Women and Infants Hospital for their care and sends a special thanks to Dr. David Beitel and Dr. Erika Werner.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

An organizer of the attempt to recall Providence City Councilor Kevin Jackson is criticizing a slowdown in the recall process, although Jackson's lawyer said his client is raising legitimate issues.

As it stands, Jackson has until 4:30 pm Friday to provide the Providence Board of Canvassers with specific objections to the more than 300 signatures gathered to initiate the recall process.

National Institutes of Health

The Rhode Island Department of Health is expanding free breast cancer follow up care for more low-income women. The program used to help only uninsured women get follow-up care after an abnormal finding during breast cancer screening. Now the program will help women who are insured but can’t afford co-pays and deductibles.

Breast cancer follow-up services include things like diagnostic breast imaging and biopsies.

RIPR file photo

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island:


During his trip, Rhode Island's senior U.S. senator will make stops in Afghanistan and Iraq. Reed’s visit comes as Iraqi forces are working to take the city of Mosul back from the Islamic State, which has controlled the city for about two years.

Reed plans to spend an unspecified amount of time in Iraq , Afghanistan and Bahrain, meeting with foreign leaders, American civilians and military personnel.

Dank Depot/flickr / Creative Commons License

A new poll from Boston public radio station WBUR finds growing support for a ballot measure that would legalize recreational marijuana. In Rhode Island, advocates have pushed for a similar measure, but some local lawmakers say they will wait to see what happens in the Bay State before taking up the issue.