Arts & Culture

bradlypjohnson / Creative Commons License

“Wicked” that ultimate prequel to “The Wizard of Oz” is back at the Providence Performing Arts Center. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale says it’s a fine Broadway quality production its many fans are going to love.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

The Czechoslovakian-born English writer Tom Stoppard's 1993 play “Arcadia” was a huge hit in London and well-enough received in New York. Now the Gamm Theatre has taken on the work. 

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep opens the theater season with a musical called "Beowolf. A Thousand Years of Baggage." Rhode Island Public Radio Theater Critic Bill Gale says "baggage" is not the word he would use, but whip-smart theater filled with great rock music and talented performers pretty much sums it up.

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

The City of Providence has a new work of public art. Installations have popped up in public spaces across the city over the past year. The latest is a large mural called “BattleCat,” painted by an Austrian artist who goes by the name NYCHOS.

It’s a part of a series of paintings created by international artists visiting the city through a residency program.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

 

Few people know that Providence is home to a plaza designed by the architect I.M. Pei, the man behind the famous pyramids outside the Louvre Museum in Paris. In the 1960s, Providence hired Pei to redesign Cathedral Square during a push for urban renewal. But the effort failed to attract people or achieve the renown of some of Pei's later projects.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

Across Rhode Island, local theaters are gearing up for their fall season. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman traveled to the Contemporary Theater Company in Wakefield to talk with Terry Shea, an actor and director who also covers theater for Motif Magazine. Shea has a line on what to expect from the great variety of local theater that Rhode Island has to offer, from the well-established to the up and coming.

Now Here This: Life At The Museum

Aug 19, 2016

Rhode Island Public Radio is airing a new series in partnership with Now Here This, a storytelling group at Brown University. On the last Friday of each month we’ll bring you a new story.

Elisabeth Harrison

The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra played a pops concert at Providence's Roger Williams Park on Thursday night, in a return of sorts for the orchestra. The philharmonic's last concert in the park dated to more than a decade ago, in 2004.

The Washington County Fair turns 50 on Wednesday, and the anniversary festivities begin with a birthday cake eating contest. As you might expect, the contest will feature 50 contestants. 

The fair officially got underway earlier in the day with an antique car show and a swine obstacle course, among other events. Founded in 1967, the fair began as a way to celebrate agriculture and reintroduce the county fair tradition to Rhode Island. 

The annual event in Richmond is now the largest agricultural fair in the state, according to organizers.

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2016

With summer nearing a close, we turn to the experts for book recommendations not to be missed on those final trips to the beach.

Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison gets a few tips from Emma Ramadan and Tom Roberge, the owners of Riffraff, a new bookstore and bar opening this Fall in Providence.

Books you have to pick up right now

Emma Ramadan:  Ladivine, Marie NDiaye 

Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission

The building in Providence's Elmwood neighborhood dates to 1892.

Camp Yawgoog, in Hopkinton Rhode Island, celebrates its centennial. The Boy Scout camp is the second oldest continuously operating Boy Scout camp in the country. Spokeswoman for the Narragansett Council of the Boy Scouts of America Kaitlin Curtis said many camp traditions haven’t changed in 100 years.

“But they’re also implementing more modern activities, such as robotics – that’s actually a merit badge that they can earn there now,” said Curtis. “So they’re modernizing to keep up with the 21st century, but also the core values are the same.”

Credit Onne van der Wal

After 8 years and $16 million, the SSV Oliver Hazard Perry is welcoming students for the first time this weekend, as Rhode Island’s official sailing education vessel. Students aboard will work alongside a professional crew to learn about ocean navigation. Executive director of the Perry, Jess Wurzbacher said the students will be learning skills fast disappearing on the water.

Now Here This: Repeat After Me

Jul 29, 2016

This story comes from a new partnership between Rhode Island Public Radio and Now Here This, an audio storytelling group at Brown University. On the last Friday of every month, we’ll bring you a new story.

Today we meet a woman who came from Botswana to attend Brown University. But she encountered a problem: almost no one in the U.S. can pronounce her name. Mitchell Johnson from Now Here This produced the story.  

Got a comment on this story? A question? A new idea? We want to hear from you! Send an email to nht@ripr.org.

John Bender / RIPR

With the start of the Newport Folk Festival on Friday, thousands of music lovers will pack Fort Adams State Park for the next three days. Then the following week, more people arrive for the Newport Jazz Festival.

As these festivals have grown in popularity, so too has the profile of the historic fort, which sat nearly empty for decades. Rhode Island Public Radio's John Bender took a tour of the fort to find out how large crowds and popular festivals are changing the historic landmark.

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