Arts & Culture

Samuel F. Babbitt / Courtesy MacMillan Children's Publishing Group/NPR

Natalie Babbitt, the 84-year-old author of the popular children's novel "Tuck Everlasting," died Monday at her home in Hamden, Connecticut.

The novel left a big mark on young readers. It tells the story of a magical spring that grants eternal life to anyone who drinks from it – and a girl who has to decide whether to live forever or accept her eventual death. Babbitt told NPR’s Melissa Block last year that she decided to write "Tuck Everlasting" in 1975 after she realized her 4-year-old daughter was terrified of death.

Rhode Island Public Radio is partnering with Now Here This, a storytelling group at Brown University. On the last Friday of each month we’ll bring you a new story.  

Today’s story is inspired by the StoryCorps podcast. Erin West speaks honestly and openly with her father about his experience with suicide and depression, as well as their changing relationship as father and daughter.

Got a comment on this story? A question? A new idea? We want to hear from you! Send an email to nht@ripr.org.

Manton Avenue Project

Live theater is thriving in Rhode Island, and one program may inspire a new generation of playwrights. The Manton Avenue Project has kids write the plays and adult actors bring them to life. Rhode Island Public Radio intern Tarpley Hitt went to a performance to check it out.  

On a Saturday evening, kids race around a small stage in Roger Williams Memorial Park, fighting for the best patch of grass. Parents lean back on beach chairs as two performers enter with microphones.

Yale Publishes Mysterious Medieval Manuscript

Oct 27, 2016
Davis Dunavin / WSHU

It’s one of the world’s great literary mysteries: a 15th century book full of bizarre illustrations of imaginary plants, astrological signs, surreal figures and landscapes. Its origins are unknown, its creator anonymous. And it’s written entirely in an unknown language that’s stumped the world’s greatest code breakers.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

“Appropriate” is both brilliant and bitter, overdone and incisive. At times, it seems to be right on, an American original, both hilarious and heartbreaking. Other times it has you asking just what are these people on stage doing, for heaven’s sake?

For two hours forty-five minutes (including two intermissions) it is a play of rage and regret, of lives ruined, hope gone.

Andrew Iacovelli/Burbage Theatre Company

Rhode Island's booming theater scene is in full pulse these days Which has lead Rhode Island Public Radio's  Bill Gale to double up.

Now playing in theaters, the film "The Birth of a Nation," reclaims the title of a 1915 movie by D.W. Griffith, which remains highly controversial for its seemingly sympathetic portrayal of the Confederacy and the Ku Klux Klan, and its use of black face. The new film, from Actor and Director Nate Parker, tells the story of the Nat Turner Rebellion, a slave uprising in Virginia in 1831 that left scores of white men, women, and children dead.

John Bender

The town of Warren, Rhode Island has been named one of America’s 5 Great Neighborhoods. The American Planning Association on Monday recognized Warren’s downtown for its “foresight, innovation, and cooperation” in building a better place to live. It’s part of APA’s Great Places in America program, to recognize streets, neighborhoods, and public spaces in the United States demonstrating exceptional character, quality and planning.

Now Here This: Sophie Is A Punk Rocker

Oct 4, 2016

Rhode Island Public Radio is airing a new series in partnership with Now Here This, a storytelling group at Brown University. On the last Friday of each month we’ll bring you a new story.

In today’s story, former “kidcore” music star Sophie Kasakove reflects on tween fame, Patti Smith, and having a loud message, or not. The story was produced by Liza Yeager.

Got a comment on this story? A question? A new idea? We want to hear from you! Send an email to nht@ripr.org.

On Rhode Island Public Radio's Artscape this month we look at podcasting, with a profile of Nate Dimeo, a podcaster based in Los Angeles, but with deep Rhode Island roots.

bradlypjohnson / Creative Commons License

“Wicked” that ultimate prequel to “The Wizard of Oz” is back at the Providence Performing Arts Center. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Bill Gale says it’s a fine Broadway quality production its many fans are going to love.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

The Czechoslovakian-born English writer Tom Stoppard's 1993 play “Arcadia” was a huge hit in London and well-enough received in New York. Now the Gamm Theatre has taken on the work. 

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep opens the theater season with a musical called "Beowolf. A Thousand Years of Baggage." Rhode Island Public Radio Theater Critic Bill Gale says "baggage" is not the word he would use, but whip-smart theater filled with great rock music and talented performers pretty much sums it up.

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

The City of Providence has a new work of public art. Installations have popped up in public spaces across the city over the past year. The latest is a large mural called “BattleCat,” painted by an Austrian artist who goes by the name NYCHOS.

It’s a part of a series of paintings created by international artists visiting the city through a residency program.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

 

Few people know that Providence is home to a plaza designed by the architect I.M. Pei, the man behind the famous pyramids outside the Louvre Museum in Paris. In the 1960s, Providence hired Pei to redesign Cathedral Square during a push for urban renewal. But the effort failed to attract people or achieve the renown of some of Pei's later projects.

Pages