Arts & Culture

John Bender / RIPR

The Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities visited Rhode Island Monday. 

The agency has invested millions of dollars in Rhode Island cultural institutions including the Rhode Island Historical Society and Brown University. NEH also has roots in Rhode Island. It was created thanks in part to a bill sponsored by the late Rhode Island Senator Claiborne Pell. NEH Chair William Adams spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio Political Analyst Scott MacKay about that history and why he thinks the federal government should continue funding for the humanities.
 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

As part of our new series “Rising Tide,” Rhode Island Public Radio is bringing you stories of life after the Great Recession. The economy is improving, but does a rising tide lift all boats, or are some Rhode Islanders still being left behind? In this next installment, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman visits a couple who started a small business, and a family, in the depths of the Great Recession.

 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This week an estimated 5,ooo ceramic artists, educators and industry professionals gathered in Providence for the 49th annual conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.

Rhode Island Public Radio's weekend host Chuck Hinman talked to two of those involved; Jay Lacouture, on-site liason and ceramics professor at Salve Regina University, and Jo-Ann Conklin, Director of the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University.

National Ceramics Conference Wraps Up In Providence

Mar 27, 2015
Emily Wooldridge / RIPR

A major ceramics conference is drawing thousands of people to the Rhode Island Convention Center. The conference features a variety of ceramic art – from traditional bowls to sculptures and even a pile of high heeled shoes. 

It is put on annually by the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts. Organizer Jacqueline Hardy said the work comes from across the globe.  

“All over the country, international; we come from Australia, China, Japan, Canada of course,” said Hardy.

Providence lawyer and mystery writer Jack Partridge is out with his third book.  His latest novel, Scratched, unravels the mystery of a dead university professor with ties to Providence’s Italian community.  

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay spoke with Partridge to talk about his novel and what makes Providence a great setting for a murder mystery.

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