Arts & Culture

Newport Folk Festival Tickets Go On Sale Thursday

Jan 8, 2015
Weekly Dig / Wikimedia Commons

Tickets for the Newport Folk Festival go on sale at 10 o’clock Thursday morning.  The music lineup has yet to be announced.

That’s been the norm for the past several years, but it hasn’t stopped the festival from selling thousands of tickets.   Last year, for the first time in its history, the complete three-day festival completely sold out.  Three-day, two-day, and single passes will all go on sale.  Ten percent of the three-day passes will be available at a special ‘early-bird rate.’

Cade Tompkins Projects

Former Gov. Lincoln Chafee said he likes his official portrait. An image of the painting was released online, but the artist has yet to officially present it to the state.

The painting shows a somber Chafee in a jacket and tie looking off to the side against a dark background. Chafee said he and artist Julie Gearan met about four times, she took picture of him, and they looked at other portraits from across the country.

“Well the main thing I said to the artist is just something different from the many that are up there,” said Chafee.

Peter Goldberg / The Gamm Theatre

Written by artistic director Tony Estrella, from the award-winning novel by British expatriate Barry Unsworth, “Morality Play” sweeps through a raucous, roiling time of murder and madness, of corruption, of just plain hard times.  It's a tidal wave of provocation and problems. Change is good? Sometimes. And sometimes it's not.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

WPRI reporter Sean Daly has been on television airwaves in Rhode Island for more than 30 years. Now, he is officially retired. Daly visited our studios to talk with Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch about how the state and the state of local news have changed over the past three decades.

He's written what’s often called “the first draft of history” for some of the biggest stories in the state: the Claus Van Bulow attempted murder trials, Buddy Cianci and Plunder Dome, the credit union crisis, and Central Falls filing for bankruptcy.

Providence LA

Foodies in Los Angeles are flocking to a restaurant named after Rhode Island’s capital city.

The restaurant Providence has received two stars from the Michelin Guide. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke with Head Chef Michael Cimarusti

Before he opened a top-rated restaurant in Los Angeles, Chef Michael Cimarusti grew up spending vacations with his grandparents in Rhode Island.

He remembers summers on Scarborough Beach, where the clam cakes were to die for.

Wikimedia Commons

One can usually hear the familiar strains of the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel’s Messiah this time of year.  The Rhode Island Philharmonic performed the piece last week, as they do each year around Christmas. 

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender sat down with conductor Andy Clark, who led the philharmonic to talk about the famous piece, and how it’s come to be such a beloved holiday tradition.

Fifty years ago Thursday President Lyndon Johnson lit the National Christmas Tree and said quote, ``These are the most hopeful times in all the years since Christ was born in Bethlehem.’’ Those words would come back to haunt him. It’s documented in a book by former Brown University professor James Patterson, Eve of Destruction.

Despite the assassination of President Kennedy a year earlier, Americans were prosperous and optimistic. But in Just a few months, that would all start to erode.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre

“Meet Me in St. Louis” is a charmer, a sweet, old fashioned, happy- go-lucky musical of the kind we just don't see anymore. It's filled with wonderful, if saccharine sweet, songs. It tells a tale of a family loving, and battling, and always coming through.

The Golden Age Grease Caper gives us hope - at least those of us who are closing in on that rock solid verification of old age, that sure fire boarding pass for the bus to Foxwoods and the complimentary roll of quarters.

The Golden Age Grease caper provides one of those cherished, you’re-never-too-old moments that can be warmly, eagerly embraced as a ringing geezer declaration of independence. 

Personally, I’m taking it as irrefutable proof that 70 is the new 65.        

Lydia Rogers/File / RIPR

For more than 80 years, Theresa Landry has taught Rhode Islanders how to dance. But Landry will hang up her tap shoes and close her studio for good Saturday.

For generations, students have tapped and turned at the Theresa Landry Dance Studio on Dexter Street in Pawtucket. But the building’s been sold, forcing Landry to retire. And at 93 years old, she’s ready. “Well I think God is telling me that it’s time for me to have more time for myself and my family,” she said.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Bill Gale admits that he raised an eyebrow when Trinity Rep announced it would do Neil Simon's 1963 hit “Barefoot in the Park.”  Why do that old joke carnival? he asked. But after seeing Trinity's production our critic has another view.

Yup, I do. Having seen this tight, funny and carefully thought out “Barefoot,” I'm saying, well, why not?”

Early Wave Of Jazz Festival Tickets Go On Sale

Nov 25, 2014
Aaron Read / RIPR

Tickets the Newport Jazz Festival’s Friday shows go on sale at ten o’clock this morning.  It’s the 61st anniversary of the festival.

The Friday concert was added for the jazz festival’s 60th anniversary last year.  Festival organizers decided to offer it again this year.  The lineup will focus on emerging artists and new jazz styles.  Performers include Grammy winner Snarky Puppy, a thirteen piece jazz fusion group, who made their festival debut last year. 

The Friday concerts will be held at Fort Adams State Park in Newport.  The tickets cost $40, and $20 for students.

In late August, the power was shut off at the River United Methodist Church. The church, in the heart of downtown Woonsocket, was about a thousand bucks in arrears on its electric bill.  The guy from National Grid apologized for doing what he had to do.

Church members, who specialize in doing a whole lot with very little, scrambled to do what they always do.   They took food from freezers and refrigerators and headed to a nearby park to feed hungry people. 

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Way back in 1843 when Charles Dickens' “A Christmas Carol” was published in London one reviewer called it “. . . a dainty dish to put before a king.” Well, Bill Gale is not entering hyperbole land quite that much. But he does say that this year's on-stage version at Trinity Rep is a winner.

Brian Gagnon / Wilbury Theatre Group

Using the same theater on Broad Street in Providence where Trinity Rep began in the 1960s, the adventurous Wilbury Group is currently staging a work about the life and times, and death, of Walt Disney. Bill Gale has this review.

“A Public Reading of An Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney” continues at the Wilbury Group in Providence through November 22. Bill Gale reviews the performing arts for Rhode Island Public Radio.

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