Arts & Culture

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

  Trinity Rep has chosen the great 1943 musical “Oklahoma!” to close its season. 

Ben Chace is a Providence native, a musician and now an international filmmaker, after writing and directing one of the first movies shot in Cuba since the Cuban Revolution. The film is called Sin Alas (Without Wings), and it just enjoyed its theatrical premiere in New York.

Chace brings his film to Providence for showings at the Cable Car Cinema this weekend. RIPR's Chuck Hinman reached Chace in Brooklyn,to talk about the film, and about working in Cuba.

http://www.cablecarcinema.com/

Folger Shakespeare Library

Time is almost up to see William Shakespeare’s First Folio on display at Brown University this month. As Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, the 17th Century book thought to have save some of Shakespeare’s most beloved plays leaves Providence after the weekend.

ALRI

This month’s Artscape features a look at a new exhibit called Support and Defend: Art Relevant to the Veteran Experience

Gamm Theatre

Pawtucket's Gamm Theatre is closing its season with one of William Shakespeare's most difficult to do plays.

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep.

“Arnie Louis and Bob” checks out three old timers, brothers ranging from their late-60s to mid-70s. All three could be called wanderers, guys who spend considerable amounts of time looking for things they can't have.

Arnie cuts grass and plows snow. Makes a living at it too, more or less. Louis is depressed, beaten down, and barely in touch with reality. Bob runs an ice-making  Zamboni machine -- when he's not longing for even a glimpse of Taylor Swift, that is.

Chuck Hinman

This year's award goes to Raymond Two Hawks Watson, a Providence resident and the chief executive officer of the Providence Cultural Equity Initiative. 

Last month, the Providence City Council passed a resolution declaring support for the Rhode Island Middle Passage Project. This is the local chapter of a nationwide effort now underway to install historic markers memorializing the lives of Africans who were the victims of the transatlantic slave trade. Rhode Island has four sites identified as places for such markers. On Thursday afternoon, April 7, the statewide committee coordinating this effort meets to plan the next steps.

Clinton campaign

For this month’s Artscape, we’re looking at the use of graphic design by the 2016 presidential candidates.  I talk to Benjamin Shaykin, a Providence-based educator and graphic designer. Shaykin also serves as a critic for the Rhode Island School of Design, and he performs that function for Rhode Island Public Radio, to help analyze the presidential campaign logos.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Over the years Trinity Rep has made its mark taking new looks at classic plays. This time out it's “To Kill a Mockingbird” that is seen with a fresh perspective. RIPR theater critic Bill Gale says the new take works, but just barely.

    

That's right. Since the days of leadership by Adrian Hall, Trinity has rarely done a show in the usual way. Think of a 1920s car being driven, more or less, through the upstairs theater decades ago. Or remember an onstage abortion, or a veteran actor chopping a chunk of beef, in place of a man.

Cinema Ritrovato

Starting Tuesday, Brown University hosts a unique four-night film festival put on by the Italian Studies Department, in conjunction with the Cineteca, or film library, in Bolgna, Italy. 

RIPR FILE

After more than 60 years at the helm, Newport Jazz Festival founder George Wein has named his successor. The festival this week named Grammy-winning bassist Christian McBride as its new artistic director.

Dead Animals: Taxidermy in Art

Mar 10, 2016
Chuck Hinman

Have you given any thought lately to your relationship with animals? Statistics reveal a contradictory interaction between humans and other species.

Here in the United States, the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that there could be as many as 176 million dogs and cats being kept as pets, many of them no doubt treated as beloved members of the family. On the other hand, figures from the Humane Society show billions of cattle, chickens and other livestock slaughtered every year for food.

In the past Festival Ballet Providence's popular Up Close on Hope series has presented evenings with half-a-dozen, or more, works by various choreographers.  But beginning tonight Up Close will present just two pieces, each taken from classic tales, both world premieres by choreographers familiar to Festival Ballet fans.

One is Venezuelan-born dancer-choreographer,” Gianni Di Marco's view of Marguerite Gautier's  “Lady of the Camellias,” a romantic idle, looking at love, and eventual death. 

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Pawtucket's Gamm Theatre is currently doing the Irish play “A Skull in Connemara.” It's a work infrequently done, certainly not as often as playwright Martin McDonagh's best, “The Beauty Queen of Leenane.” Bill Gale thinks he knows the reason why.

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