Environment

Photo Courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island may mount a research expedition to the most active underwater volcano in the Caribbean Sea. Disaster management authorities there have been on alert for more than a week. Earthquakes have been recorded around the area of the volcano known as Kick’Em Jenny off the coast of the island of Grenada, indicating a potential eruption. 

Steve Wood

Rhode Island’s Land Trust Council is inviting the public to enjoy all of the green space the environmental coalition has preserved over the years. Organizers have planned more than 50 outdoor events across the state, starting with a walk Friday night in Bristol to admire the rare blue moon.

Rhode Island Land Trust Director, Rupert Friday said the events known as “Land Trust Days” provide a chance to unplug and reconnect with nature. 

August is high-alert month for the Asian Longhorned beetle.  The invasive species can cause extensive damage to forested areas and has been found as close as Boston.In Worcester, the beetle was responsible for destroying some 34,000 trees.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is asking Rhode Islanders to check local trees for dime-sized holes  and dead branches that indicate the presence of the beetle.

"You could also see shallow chew marks in the bark where the beetle would lay eggs," said U.S.D.A. spokesman Elvis Cordova.

swampyank/creative commons license

Rhode Island has enacted new protections for the state’s freshwater wetlands. The new legislation, signed into law Wednesday, streamlines the process for developers hoping to build near wetlands.

But that doesn’t mean that it will be easier to build along those wetlands, according to state officials.

Prior to the legislation, developers needed approval from both the state and cities and towns to begin building. Now developers only need state approval.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Deepwater Wind has installed the first of five steel foundations for a wind farm that will sit three miles off the coast of Block Island. The project is expected to produce enough energy to power 17,000 homes. State and federal officials got an up-close look at construction for the first time yesterday. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza was with them, and she reports that Rhode Island has become an example for how to build renewable energy. 

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