Warwick Mayor Scott Avedisian heads to New Hampshire this weekend for a summit on coastal flooding and sea level rise. 


The Community College of Rhode Island plans to open a new facility in Westerly to train workers for Electric Boat.

The company needs welders and other specialized employees to build nuclear submarines. Rhode Island Education Commissioner Jim Purcell said the new center is part of an effort to be more responsive to Electric Boat and other companies.

“And we’ve made a commitment to actually have a learning center at Westerly, which is really going to support job opportunity and access not only here in Rhode Island, but also at the Groton, Ct. site,” said Purcell.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Photographer Peter Green enjoys bird watching around Rhode Island. But his favorite spot is downtown Providence.  Most people are too busy to notice birds of prey circling this urban setting. But Green has become something of an expert.

Federal officials are collecting public comments this week about National Grid’s proposal to build a liquefied natural gas facility in Providence. Residents can sign up to speak at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s public hearing beginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday, October 8 at Juanita Sanchez Educational Complex.

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Ocean planners from near and far will gather for the annual Ronald C. Baird Sea Grant Science Symposium at the University of Rhode Island’s Bay Campus to exchange ideas about how to continue to share the ocean.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Humans have been harnessing energy from rivers for thousands of years. Think water wheels from Ancient Greece and modern hydropower plants, like the Hoover Dam. Brown University engineers have a new take on a hydropower device that could harness enough energy to power communities in remote locations or along fast-flowing rivers.

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The lead federal agency involved in the Block Island Wind Farm has embarked on a five-year study to examine the project’s environmental impact.

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Some of the highest tides of the year will reach Rhode Island shores over the next few days. The Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council is encouraging residents to take photos of the so-called “king tides” using their new mobile app. CRMC spokesperson Laura Dwyer said the pictures could provide a glimpse into the future.

“These tides over the next few days will really best illustrate how, how things will be how things will look with sea level rise, so this is a great way for us to visualize the impact,” said Dwyer.

Courtesy of Brown University

Brown University researchers studying contaminated sites around the state have gotten a $10.8 million dollar boost from the federal government to continue their work for the next five years.

Monarch Migration Drives Insects To Rhode Island Coast

Sep 29, 2015
Kenneth Dwain Harrelson / Wikimedia Commons

Monarch butterflies have made their way into Rhode Island, as they migrate south. These orange and black insects have migrated to the coast to gather food in the form of nectar.

David Gregg, of the Rhode Island Natural History Survey, says look for Monarchs on warm and sunny days in places like Westerly and Newport.

"Butterflies are active during the day, when it’s warm and sunny, because that’s when flowers produce the most nectar,” said Gregg. “That’s what makes butterflies go. So any flowery place along the coast.” 

RIPR File Photo

Cities and towns across the state will collectively receive half a million dollars from the state’s landfill agency for recycling.

Deepwater Wind is still on schedule to complete the first construction phase of the Block Island Wind Farm, despite issues related to equipment reliability and worker safety. Contractors have about one more month of construction to go, according to Grover Fugate, the executive director of the Coastal Resources Management Council.

Fugate said Deepwater Wind has gotten its contractors to implement safety recommendations and replace inadequate equipment for choppy ocean conditions.

Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse have asked President Obama to share details about his plans to designate areas off the New England coast as a marine national monument.

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Scientists from the Department of Environmental Management are investigating fish die-offs in the Seekonk River and Pawtuxet Cove. 


President Obama wants to permanently protect underwater canyons and sea mountains off the coast of Cape Cod and a mountain chain in the Gulf of Maine. He would do so by using a law presidents have historically used to establish national monuments, such as the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Park. But his proposal got a mixed reception at a town hall meeting hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Tuesday night.