Environment

Scott Comings / Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy

The Pawcatuck River will have one less dam along its river in the near future. The Nature Conservancy has filed a wetlands permit application in Rhode Island to remove the White Rock Dam beginning this summer.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island is losing salt marshes at an alarming rate. Scientists and coastal planners say this is one of the most pressing climate change impacts already facing the Ocean State. Salt marshes are critical fish and wildlife habitats that support the state's fishing and tourism industries.

This harsh winter has been hard on all of us, and it's also taken a toll on our wildlife, especially waterfowl and songbirds. February is on record for the most number of injured birds a wildlife clinic in North Kingstown has taken during a winter season.

Kristin Fletcher, executive director of Wildlife Rehabilitators Association of Rhode Island, said frozen waters have made it difficult for waterfowl to fish. The nonprofit’s clinic is taking care of emaciated and dehydrated birds, including many Canada geese. Fletcher said winter is usually the clinic's quiet season. 

Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Commerce

The fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has exempted some Gulf of Maine fishermen from emergency fishing restrictions it issued last November. A fisheries analyst said the latest compromise still meets the goal to protect the region’s cod, but not everyone agrees.

NOAA Fisheries issued fishing trip limits last November that would reduce the Gulf of Maine cod catch by 20 metric tons. Fisheries policy analyst William Whitmore said fishermen came back with an alternate proposal.

John Bender / RIPR

The state is suing a scrap metal yard on the Providence waterfront, at the upper Narragansett Bay, for alleged environmental violations.  This is not the first time the company has come under fire.

Back in 2012, the Department of Environmental Management, notified Rhode Island Recycled Metals, it was violating numerous rules on water pollution.  The state worked with the company on a plan to solve the issues.  But more than 2 years later, the DEM says the company still hasn’t cleaned up. DEM director Janet Coit says she’s taking them to court.

Pages