John Bender / RIPR

The state of Rhode Island and a scrap metal recycler have reached an agreement through a court order to address pollution on the Providence waterfront. The state recently sued Rhode Island Recycled Metals for failing to comply with environmental rules. 

  David Chopy, chief of the Department of Environmental Management’s Office of Compliance and Inspection, said the state is concerned that the company doesn’t have enough money to do the required cleanup.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The state Coastal Resources Management Council has awarded more than $200,000 to nine habitat restoration projects. The projects aim to protect from the impacts of climate change.

These nine habitat restoration projects span a good stretch of the state, from Napatree Point in Westerly to Quicksand Pond in Little Compton and Blackstone Park in Providence.

RIPR File Photo

A new economic study by a forecasting firm has found that putting a tax on carbon pollution would reduce emissions and create jobs in Rhode Island. That will be the topic of a briefing this afternoon at Brown University.

The scrap metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront that the state is suing for alleged environmental violations, is scheduled to be back in Court later this morning. The Court will issue a few orders.

The state attorney general’s office and the Department of Environmental Management jointly filed a lawsuit against Rhode Island Recycled Metals. These two state agencies are asking the Court to order the company to clean up and recap the scrap metal yard, a former Superfund site.

  Executives in the clean energy sector will meet with lawmakers Tuesday at the statehouse to showcase their growing industry. The event is organized by the New England Clean Energy Council. Coordinator Charity Pennock said many lawmakers lack information about what the clean energy industry does.

“So having people come in who are running businesses, who are doing work in the state, really describe what they’re doing and how they’re both developing their companies and participating in the economy is important,” said Pennock.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Natural disasters and extreme weather events cause great physical damage, but they can also take a toll on mental health. That’s the topic the state Department of Health and the Executive Climate Change Coordinating Council will explore this week at workshops they are co-sponsoring.

The workshops are tailored for mental health practitioners, health department employees, and the general public.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The female falcon that nested atop the Superman building last year is back this spring. The falcon laid her first egg less than a week ago, according to Jeff Hall, senior director of advancement for the Audubon Society of Rhode Island.

Through the organization’s Peregrine webcam, bird enthusiasts are observing the falcon and her male partner taking turns at the nest. Hall said the falcon will sit on her eggs constantly until all her eggs are laid.

“So all the eggs will then mature, if you would, at the same time,” said Hall. “so they’ll all hatch around the same time.”

RIPR File Photo

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has infused $1.6 million into the Rhode Island Sea Grant Program. This money will support ongoing research and conservation projects in the Ocean State.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo’s budget proposal includes some new initiatives for the environment, including a larger role for the state’s Clean Water Finance Agency. Rhode Island Public Radio’s environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison to discuss the environmental impact of the budget.

Scott Comings / Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy

The Pawcatuck River will have one less dam along its river in the near future. The Nature Conservancy has filed a wetlands permit application in Rhode Island to remove the White Rock Dam beginning this summer.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island is losing salt marshes at an alarming rate. Scientists and coastal planners say this is one of the most pressing climate change impacts already facing the Ocean State. Salt marshes are critical fish and wildlife habitats that support the state's fishing and tourism industries.

This harsh winter has been hard on all of us, and it's also taken a toll on our wildlife, especially waterfowl and songbirds. February is on record for the most number of injured birds a wildlife clinic in North Kingstown has taken during a winter season.

Kristin Fletcher, executive director of Wildlife Rehabilitators Association of Rhode Island, said frozen waters have made it difficult for waterfowl to fish. The nonprofit’s clinic is taking care of emaciated and dehydrated birds, including many Canada geese. Fletcher said winter is usually the clinic's quiet season. 

Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Commerce

The fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has exempted some Gulf of Maine fishermen from emergency fishing restrictions it issued last November. A fisheries analyst said the latest compromise still meets the goal to protect the region’s cod, but not everyone agrees.

NOAA Fisheries issued fishing trip limits last November that would reduce the Gulf of Maine cod catch by 20 metric tons. Fisheries policy analyst William Whitmore said fishermen came back with an alternate proposal.

John Bender / RIPR

The state is suing a scrap metal yard on the Providence waterfront, at the upper Narragansett Bay, for alleged environmental violations.  This is not the first time the company has come under fire.

Back in 2012, the Department of Environmental Management, notified Rhode Island Recycled Metals, it was violating numerous rules on water pollution.  The state worked with the company on a plan to solve the issues.  But more than 2 years later, the DEM says the company still hasn’t cleaned up. DEM director Janet Coit says she’s taking them to court.

Flo Jonic

  Lawmakers have put the breaks on legislation that could put trash incineration on the table at the Central Landfill. A committee voted to hold the bill for further study. The bill would remove language in a law that bans the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation from including incineration in its statewide trash management plan. It would also remove any references to the high costs of incineration. This is the latest attempt to remove a ban on trash incineration.