Environment

Environment
3:44 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse Increases Call For Climate Change Action

Credit Courtesy of U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) announced a new initiative aimed at pushing for urgent action on climate change.  

This is one of several efforts by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse to address climate change. He’s delivered weekly speeches on the issue for more than a year and formed the Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change last year with Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA).

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Marine Biology
9:20 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Hundreds Of Baby Reef Octopi Born At Aquarium In North Kingstown

Caribbean Reef Octopus
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of new babies have arrived at the Biomes Marine Biology Center in North Kingstown.

Pearl, a reef octopus, native to the Carribean, laid between one-hundred fifty and two hundred eggs at the center last year.  Many of them hatched over the weekend.

It’s the first time this has happened at the center in its twenty year history.

It’s a very rare occurrence in New England, says executive director Mark Hall, because the octopus, which was caught in New England waters, must have bred in the wild.

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Animals
2:12 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Roger Williams Park Zoo Works To Keep Animals Warm Through The Bitter Cold

Sabu the snow leopard poses for a picture at Roger Williams Park Zoo.
Credit Roger Williams Park Zoo

Though much of the snow is gone, Rhode Islanders aren’t getting a reprieve from the bitter cold.

And neither are the animals at Roger Williams Park Zoo.

With temperatures hovering in the teens, and not expected to get much warmer, officials at the zoo report the major challenge is keeping tropical animals, like elephants and alligators, safe. 

All animals whose natural habitats are warm are being kept in heated barns.

But animals like the snow leopard, and red pandas, which hail from the high mountains of Asia, are more active now than in the summer months.

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Environment
3:03 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

RI Lakes And Ponds Stocked For Winter Fishing

Trout stocking pools
Credit Catherine Welch / RIPR

The state Department of Environmental Management is stocking six Rhode Island ponds with brook trout for the winter fishing season.  According to a press release, the agency is stocking six ponds with 1,000 brook trout. This is on top of the 2,000 trout that were stocked last month.

Anglers are required to carry a current fishing license and a Trout Conservation Stamp. The daily bag limit currently stands at two fish per day.

Anglers are forbidden from wearing felt-soled footgear, as it promotes the spread of invasive species.

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Environment
4:04 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Providence Wind Turbines Generating More Energy Than Expected

Credit RIPR

The three wind turbines at Field’s Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Providence are generating more energy than originally projected.

Field’s Point Wastewater Treatment Facility is one of the largest consumers of electricity in the state. It treats about 50 million gallons of wastewater from the greater Providence metropolitan area and may treat up to 200 million gallons a day during intense storms.

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Recycling
8:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

State Officials Urge Residents To Recycle Their Christmas Trees

Christmas is over, time to recycle those trees! They're turned into mulch.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

With Christmas over, many families have already started to take down the tree.  State officials are urging people to recycle them.

Most Rhode Island communities provide curbside pick-up of Christmas trees. The trees are hauled to the central landfill in Johnston, where they’re ground up for use as mulch in the spring.

Sarah Kite, director of recycling services at the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation which operates the landfill, said they accept all organic Christmas decorations provided they’re stripped bare.

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Environment
5:19 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

Trout Stocked In State For Winter Fishing Season

Close up of rainbow trout.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Anglers can count on trout to fish over the winter season. Officials with the Department of Environmental Management’s Fish and Wildlife Division stocked approximately 2,000 rainbow trout in several ponds statewide during the first two weeks of December.

Those ponds include Carbuncle Pond in Coventry, Barber Pond in South Kingstown, Silver Spring Lake in North Kingstown, and the Wood River with access from Route 165 in Exeter.

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Environment
5:00 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Brown Welcomes New Greenhouse For Plant Research

Brown University's new greenhouse, formally known as the Plant Environmental Center, sits atop the new Building for Environmental Research and Teaching.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

The New Year is set to usher in a new era of plant research at Brown University with a new greenhouse atop the renovated Building for Environmental Research and Teaching (BERT).

The new greenhouse, formally known as the Plant Environmental Center (PEC), gives university researchers the ability to grow and study plants in multiple environments, allowing plant researchers to study the effects of climate change on plants. For the first time, researchers will be able to simulate various environmental conditions, such as high temperatures and droughts.

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Environment
3:02 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Repurposing, Recycling Old Clothes Cuts Carbon Footprint

One way to reduce your carbon footprint is to donate or repurpose your old clothes and other rags. Textile recycling has a greater impact on reducing greenhouse gas emissions than you might think.

Representatives with the nonprofit Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles said clothing and textiles are not typically considered recyclable products. But they estimate 95 percent of all clothing and other household textiles can be recycled and repurposed, as long as they are clean and dry.

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Environment
2:02 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Regional Rift Over Who Should Pay for Power Lines Across New England

Federal regulators are being asked to resolve a regional rift over who should pay for new power lines needed to carry renewable electricity to southern New England.

Vermont has joined New Hampshire and Rhode Island to oppose the cost-sharing formula being promoted by Massachusetts, Connecticut and Maine. The question now before federal authorities is how much rate payers in Vermont should pay for a power line project that mainly benefits people in southern New England.

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