Jon Hamilton http://ripr.org en Education May Help Insulate The Brain Against Traumatic Injury http://ripr.org/post/education-may-help-insulate-brain-against-traumatic-injury A little education goes a long way toward ensuring you'll recover from a serious traumatic brain injury. In fact, people with lots of education are seven times more likely than high school dropouts to have no measurable disability a year later.<p>"It's a very dramatic difference," says <a href="https://www.hopkinsresearch.org/BIO/BIO_BioPg.aspx?User_ID=37446">Eric Schneider</a>, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins and the lead author of a new study. Wed, 23 Apr 2014 20:36:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 32525 at http://ripr.org Education May Help Insulate The Brain Against Traumatic Injury One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures http://ripr.org/post/one-scientists-quest-vanquish-epileptic-seizures In the early 1990s, a young brain researcher named <a href="http://www.anatomy.uci.edu/solteszres.html">Ivan Soltesz</a> heard a story that would shape his career.<p>His adviser told him about a school for children whose epileptic seizures were so severe and frequent that they had to wear helmets to prevent head injuries. The only exception to the helmet rule was for students who received an award.<p>"The big deal for them is that they can take the helmet off while they're walking across the stage," Soltesz says. Fri, 18 Apr 2014 21:42:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 32292 at http://ripr.org One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women http://ripr.org/post/gene-linked-alzheimers-poses-special-threat-women A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease appears especially dangerous to women and may be one reason that more women than men are diagnosed with the disease.<p>The gene, known as APOE4, increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's in both sexes. Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:48:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 32045 at http://ripr.org Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade http://ripr.org/post/forgotten-childhood-why-early-memories-fade-0 <p></p><p></p><p>Francis Csedrik, who is 8 and lives in Washington, D.C., remembers a lot of events from when he was 4 or just a bit younger. There was the time he fell "headfirst on a marble floor" and got a concussion, the day someone stole the family car ("my dad had to chase it down the block"), or the morning he found a black bat (the furry kind) in the house.</p> Wed, 09 Apr 2014 13:52:20 +0000 Jon Hamilton 31772 at http://ripr.org The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade http://ripr.org/post/fading-memories Francis Csedrik, who is 8 and lives in Washington, D.C., remembers a lot of events from when he was 4 or just a bit younger. There was the time he fell "headfirst on a marble floor" and got a concussion, the day someone stole the family car ("my dad had to chase it down the block"), or the morning he found a black bat (the furry kind) in the house.<p>But Francis looks puzzled when his mom, Joanne Csedrik, asks him about a family trip to the Philippines when he was 3. "It was to celebrate someone's birthday," she tells him. "We took a long plane ride, two boat trips," she adds. Tue, 08 Apr 2014 21:46:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 31742 at http://ripr.org The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin http://ripr.org/post/map-developing-human-brain-shows-where-problems-begin A high-resolution map of the human brain in utero is providing hints about the origins of brain disorders including schizophrenia and <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/03/26/294446735/brain-changes-suggest-autism-starts-in-the-womb">autism</a>.<p>The map shows where genes are turned on and off throughout the entire brain at about the midpoint of pregnancy, a time when critical structures are taking shape, researchers <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13185">reported</a> Wednesday in the journal <em>Nature</em>.<p>"It's a pretty big leap," says <a href="http://www.alleninstit Wed, 02 Apr 2014 18:24:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 31429 at http://ripr.org Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin Jump In Autism Cases May Not Mean It's More Prevalent http://ripr.org/post/higher-autism-numbers-may-not-mean-actual-increase-kids The government's latest <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss6302a1.htm?s_cid=ss6302a1_w">estimate</a> shows that 1 in 68 children in the U.S. has an autism spectrum disorder. Thu, 27 Mar 2014 19:30:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 31141 at http://ripr.org Jump In Autism Cases May Not Mean It's More Prevalent Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb http://ripr.org/post/brain-changes-suggest-autism-starts-womb The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.<p>Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, <a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1307491?query=featured_home">researchers report</a> in the <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. Wed, 26 Mar 2014 22:30:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 31104 at http://ripr.org Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb Alzheimer's Diagnosis Expanding To Catch Early Warning Signs http://ripr.org/post/alzheimers-diagnosis-expanding-catch-early-warning-signs Alzheimer's disease isn't what it used to be. Wed, 19 Mar 2014 22:34:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 30733 at http://ripr.org Alzheimer's Diagnosis Expanding To Catch Early Warning Signs Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions http://ripr.org/post/alzheimers-blood-test-raises-ethical-questions An experimental blood test can identify people in their 70s who are likely to develop Alzheimer's disease within two or three years. The test is accurate more than 90 percent of the time, scientists <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.3466">reported</a> Sunday in <em>Nature Medicine.</em><p>The finding could lead to a quick and easy way for seniors to assess their risk of Alzheimer's, says <a href="http://explore.georgetown.edu/people/hjf8/">Dr. Howard Federoff</a>, a professor of neurology at Georgetown University. Sun, 09 Mar 2014 18:04:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 30179 at http://ripr.org Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions