This I Believe Rhode Island: Metaphor

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  Most of us have found that metaphors help us make sense of our complicated world, pushing us to view life’s complexities through alternate lenses and images.  Metaphors are the creative tools of writers, artists, and therapists.  The renowned author and anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson once said, “there are few things as toxic as a bad metaphor.  You can’t think without metaphors.”  Lindsay Aromin surely has made good use of metaphors in her life.

Lindsay Aromin is an English teacher at North Smithfield High School, where each year her ninth grade students write their own “This I Believe” essays.

Rhode Island’s Health Insurance Commissioner has received some patient complaints that insurers failed to cover the mental illness or addiction treatment  they needed. That's why the office will now undertake a system-wide test of health insurers' plans and practices under the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. It prohibits coverage limits for mental health and substance abuse treatment that aren't imposed for medical or surgical coverage.

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Rhode Island's Department of Education has reduced slightly the percentage of students who took the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), a standardized test now administered annually in public schools.

State officials now say 88 percent of students took the English portion of the test, two percentage points lower than originally reported. Ninety percent of students participated in the Math test.

Gov. Gina Raimondo’s recent roll out of more than $4 million in job training grants to a bevy of Rhode Island agencies likely includes some money that may end up training Connecticut workers, RIPR has learned.

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A fire in the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system on the roof of the Textron building created billowing smoke that could be seen for miles away Sunday morning.

Firefighters brought the fire under control shortly after reporting to the scene. The blaze was reported at about 10:30 AM.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Public safety commissioner Steve Pare said the cause is not believed to be suspicious.


As the debate about receiving more Syrian refugees continues, a Hasbro Children’s Hospital doctor worries about refugees who have already made the journey to Rhode Island.

Dr. Carol Lewis runs the health clinic for refugee children at Hasbro. She says she worries about how the escalating back-and-forth about accepting refugees will affect her teenage patients in particular.

“They’re hearing this stuff on the news. And how must that make them feel? When you hear these terribly un-welcoming comments about refugees," said Lewis.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

At the end of a filling Thanksgiving feast, you might be wondering: what on earth should I do with this big turkey skeleton with bits of meat all over it? You could compost it instead of sending it to the landfill. But it’s a lot of work to do it right. One local man is making it really easy to compost.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave sit down with president and CEO of Collette of Pawtucket, Dan Sullivan. Sullivan is a travel industry veteran, whose company organizes guided vacations and tours all over the world. The three talk about how the travel industry has been affected by the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, what travelers should know about security, and the growing popularity of Cuba as a travel destination.

When to listen:

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Police are maintaining extra patrols this weekend in an attempt to reduce cases of impaired driving.

Law enforcement calls the Thanksgiving holiday weekend one of the most dangerous times of the year to be on the roads. In an effort to fight that, State Police and local departments are teaming up as part of what they call Operation Blue RIPTIDE.

This effort is funded by the state Department of Transportation. Extra police patrols will be on the lookout for impaired drivers in high-traffic, high-incident areas.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

It’s the day after Thanksgiving, for many that means door-buster deals, and low-priced consumer electronics, but in Rhode Island the day also offers an opportunity to give back.

For the 19th year in a row, local political activist Greg Gerritt has organized a ‘Buy-Nothing Day’ winter coat drive, the day after Thanksgiving. The statewide drive operates donation and pickup sites at locations across Rhode Island.

Gerritt said he thinks of the event as an antidote to a society too driven by consuming.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This month we bring you a special, Thanksgiving Rhode Island  Artscape. We take look at the art and the history of the Thanksgiving menu, and how it’s changed

John Bender / RIPR

As families across the state prepare to put their Thanksgiving turkeys in the oven for a long roasting, some may wonder, just where that fowl came from. Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender visited one poultry farm in West Greenwich to find out more about raising these traditional birds. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

On this Thanksgiving day, most Rhode Islanders are enjoying a big meal and time with family and friends. But there’s no time off for the state’s emergency departments – ready around the clock to treat whatever comes their way. 

Rhode Island Hospital emergency department director Dr. David Portelli says that’s usually kitchen accidents, and the results of overindulgence. “When we do look at the numbers, we do see there’s more lacerations – about three times as many by percent – and some more episodes of congestive heart failure.”

David Sullivan, Rhode Island’s well-regarded state tax administrator, is leaving his post in state government for a private sector job.

T.F. Green Airport Security Gate
Catherine Welch / RIPR

Thanksgiving is one of the busiest travel periods of the year. T.F. Green Airport officials expect a rush through Sunday. But they’ve planned ahead to help travelers unwind.