News

  The U.S. Open starts Monday in New York, and there’s reason for Rhode Island tennis fans to pay attention other than Serena Williams’s bid for a calendar-year Grand Slam.

Newport Historical Society

Dozens of historical reenactors gather in Newport Saturday to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Stamp Act Riots. The events were some of the first rumblings of the Revolutionary War.

In 1765, a group of Newporters, taking their lead from rebels in Massachusetts, rioted against the Stamp Act. The legislation would have levied a new tax on the colonists. It was approved in England, over the colony’s objections.

Westerly residents are asking the town council to drop or modify a consent agreement it signed last year with the owner and tenants of a controversial quarry. 

A summer slowdown of news? Rhode Island's summer of 2015 will likely be remembered for two important releases of information -- the State Police report on Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, and, more significantly, the unsealing of documents in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios. As always, feel free to drop me a tip or your comments, and to follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Students head to classrooms this week in the annual back-to-school ritual. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this should be the year our public schools embrace teaching history and civics.

From Providence to Pasadena, history teaching in our public schools is in a sorry state. A study  by the Rhode Island Historical Society shows that despite the need for for students to know more about the past, history education is getting short shrift in the classrooms.

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