Maggie Hall / Wilbury Theatre Group

Using the same theater space where Trinity Rep began more than 50 years ago, The Wilbury Group is another young theater willing to take a chance. Bill Gale says their latest work, “Dry Land,” is certainly risky.

Ah, yes, so it is. Written by Ruby Rae Spiegel when she was still an undergraduate at  Yale University, “Dry Land” rushes you into a vortex of, well, you could say a bunch of  kids being young and stupid.

Law enforcement officials are turning to the courts as they look to turn the tide on a drug overdose epidemic. Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin says it will be increasingly common to bring murder charges against drug dealers and manufacturers involved in an overdose death.

“We actually have a case right now regarding a fentanyl death," said Kilmartin. "And that’s in the court process. And we’ll see what the outcome of the case is. It’s the first case ever prosecuted in the state like that so we’re hopeful.”

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The state Department of Transportation is negotiating a possible consent decree with the US Justice Department due to environmental damage caused by years of inadequately monitored runoff on highways around the state.

John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation/Creative Commons License

Artist Nicole Eisenman, who received a BFA in painting from RISD in 1987 is part of the new class of MacArthur Grant recipients.

Eisenman works in a variety of media including painting, sculpture and printmaking.


A former House Finance chairman is downplaying his role in the loan program used to lure 38 Studios to Rhode Island in 2010. Steve Costantino now serves as a publicly funded health insurance program in Vermont.

John Bender / RIPR

Heavy rain may continue on and off through the end of the week, according to forecasters. The National Weather Service issued a hazardous weather outlook on Wednesday morning, when downpours caused localized flooding.

Meteorologist Bill Simpson said while the rainy weather will last through the weekend, the heaviest downpours may let up.

“This is not constant heavy rain like we’re experiencing now, but again, we’re talking about five days,” said Simpson. “Later on Thursday into Friday, and then we’ll see what happens for the weekend.”

This I Believe Rhode Island: Say When

Sep 29, 2015

  All of us experience painful losses during the course of our lives.  The beloved family pet who dies after years of comforting companionship.  The dreadful breakup of a decades-long marriage.  The inevitable, but nonetheless agonizing, death of a nurturing parent.  At times these losses seem overwhelming and nearly impossible to bear.  Yet sometimes profound loss opens windows to new and remarkable insights and appreciations.  And that's what we hear from Bev Wright.


Courtesy of Hinckley Allen

Malcolm "Mac" Farmer III will receive the Family Service of Rhode Island’s Brighter Futures Award, which is given annually to a person or organization making an "outstanding contribution to the well-being of children.’’

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Some of the highest tides of the year will reach Rhode Island shores over the next few days. The Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council is encouraging residents to take photos of the so-called “king tides” using their new mobile app. CRMC spokesperson Laura Dwyer said the pictures could provide a glimpse into the future.

“These tides over the next few days will really best illustrate how, how things will be how things will look with sea level rise, so this is a great way for us to visualize the impact,” said Dwyer.

Courtesy of Brown University

Brown University researchers studying contaminated sites around the state have gotten a $10.8 million dollar boost from the federal government to continue their work for the next five years.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s Medicaid director, Dr. Deidre Gifford, is stepping down. A search for her replacement is underway.

Brown University has revoked an honorary degree awarded to the comedian Bill Cosby in the wake of allegations he drugged and sexually assaulted a series of women, allegations Cosby has repeatedly denied.

Brown President Christina Paxson, in an email to the campus community, explained the reason for the action, taken by the university's Board of Fellows.  

Kenneth Dwain Harrelson / Wikimedia Commons

Monarch butterflies have made their way into Rhode Island, as they migrate south. These orange and black insects have migrated to the coast to gather food in the form of nectar.

David Gregg, of the Rhode Island Natural History Survey, says look for Monarchs on warm and sunny days in places like Westerly and Newport.

"Butterflies are active during the day, when it’s warm and sunny, because that’s when flowers produce the most nectar,” said Gregg. “That’s what makes butterflies go. So any flowery place along the coast.” 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A year ago, Rhode Island agreed to find better opportunities for at least 2,000 people with developmental and learning disabilities. It was part of a settlement after a federal investigation uncovered a program that funneled people with disabilities into sweat shops, where they toiled for very little pay. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The United Nurses and Allied Professionals Union has reached a new contract deal. The three-year labor agreement with Rhode Island Hospital affects some 2000 union nurses and technicians.