Cranston Mayor Allan Fung joins Bonus Q+A this week to discuss a host of issues, including a lawsuit filed by public safety retirees over pension cuts, his preference in the presidential race, his political future, and more.

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the debate over Syrian refugees, fallout from Cranston's police controversy, and the state's disappointing PARCC scores.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

On a 9-0 margin, the House Oversight Committee voted Thursday to seek a subpoena meant to spur State House testimony by Curt Schilling about his ill-fated video game company, 38 Studios. Yet the committee's counsel, Charles Knowles, told the panel that a court in Massachusetts, where Schilling resides, is unlikely to recognize the subpoena.

State Rep. Karen MacBeth (D-Cumberland), who chairs the committee, said there's value in issuing the subpoena, even if it doesn't succeed in the short-term in causing testimony by Schilling.

Environmental advocates are poking holes in a proposal from power company Invenergy to build a new natural gas power plant in Burrillville. Invenergy has detailed its plans in a thick permit application to the state Energy Facility Siting Board. But the nonprofit Conservation Law Foundation has questioned claims the facility will help reduce carbon emissions or save money for rate payers. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza joined Dave Fallon in the studio with more details. 


Central Falls Mayor James Diossa, a Democrat, has joined mayors from New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and 14 other cities in saying they are ready and willing to accept even more refugees than the Obama administration has proposed.

In a letter to the president, the mayors said, ``We will welcome the Syrian families to make homes and new lives in our cities.’’

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

About 72% of seventh graders got the HPV vaccination, according to preliminary data from the state health department. The HPV vaccine was a new requirement for this school year, and it generated complaints from some parents.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nationally, 60% of girls between 13 and 17 had at least one HPV dose, and 41% of boys between 13 and 17 got at least one HPV dose in 2014. The recommendations are for boys and girls to receive all three doses by the time they finish high school.

John Bender / RIPR

Two new firms will be taking over the management of the state’s $7 billion CollegeBound fund. The fund was created in 1998 to help Rhode Islanders save money for college.

State Treasurer Seth Magaziner led the move to change management of the CollegeBound fund. He saidparticipants will benefit from the hiring of the highly rated investment company Invesco and Ascensus, the nation’s biggest administrator of so-called 529 college savings programs.

Rhode Islanders with Medicaid coverage may have a more difficult time finding a doctor. And every obstetrics and gynecology practice in the state has a waiting list. Those are just two of the findings in a massive survey just completed by the state’s health department.

Elisabeth Harrison


Now that we have results from the first year of a new standardized test, designed specifically to measure progress on the Common Core, it is fascinating to see how Rhode Island students compare to other students who took the same test.

Like Rhode Island, all of the states I have looked at so far saw significant declines in proficiency rates after switching to PARCC, but some still outperformed students in Rhode Island. I should note that not all states have released PARCC data, and a more complete comparison will be available once they do.

Buddy Cianci’s mayoral portrait is scheduled to be unveiled Thursday evening at Providence City Hall with a reception to follow at the Roma restaurant on Federal Hill.

But there has been a last-minute change of plans because one of the men slated to officiate at Cianci’s ceremony – Providence City Archivist Paul Campbell – has been suspended with pay from his $60,000 a year job.

Environmental advocates at the Conservation Law Foundation are trying to intervene in the effort to build a new natural gas-fired power plant in the state. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza explains.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo says she is waiting for direction from the Obama administration, before making any decisions about sheltering Syrian refugees. Raimondo was part of a White House call with 34 other governors on Tuesday about the question of taking in refugees.

Across the country, 27 governors have threatened to close their borders to Syrian refugees, following the terrorist attacks in Paris.

Raimondo has yet to take a strong position on the issue, since the violence in France.

John Bender / RIPR

State officials unveiled new programs Wednesday aimed at spurring high-tech jobs and the healthcare industry. They’ve earmarked 1.75-million dollars for the initiatives.

One program provides up to 50-thousand dollars to businesses partnering with colleges and universities in the state. Another program provides a similar incentive for business collaboration.  Governor Gina Raimondo said she hopes the new programs will make the state more competitive with nearby Massachusetts.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State Senator Elaine Morgan (R-Hopkinton) is attracting national attention for an email she sent condemning Islam and calling for Syrian refugees in the US to be kept in a "camp" separate from Americans.

James Baumgartner / RIPR

The Providence City Council finance committee voted to approve a proposed downtown hotel Tuesday night. The project was proposed earlier this year, but movement on the issue was slow.

A local developer wants to build a nine-story hotel on the site of a now-vacant government building. The project was proposed this summer, but the city’s finance committee did not vote on it for several months. Local construction workers felt opposition by a hotel workers union seemed to be stalling the project.