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The state Ethics Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to adopt a moratorium on outside ethics complaints in the 90 days before a general election.

The moratorium is intended to discourage politically motivated complaints, although the commission reserves the right to launch its own investigations or complaints, commission spokesman Jason Gramitt said.

Common Cause of Rhode Island, Operation Clean Government, and the League of Women Voters supported the moratorium, Gramitt said.

RIPR FILE

Education advocates say there’s a lot to like about the state’s new budget for public schools. That includes new funding for special education and early childhood education. But some advocates are concerned about the future of charter schools.

For more on that, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke to Daniela Fairchild from the Rhode Island Campaign for Achievement Now, a group that advocates for charter schools and higher standards for all schools, among other issues.

    

The Republican National Convention enters its second day Tuesday in Cleveland, after addressing a lot of routine business during day one. That included approving a party platform that pulls the GOP to the far right on several issues, including gay rights. 

But some New England delegates believe the platform is no true concern.

Ambar

Hundreds of Burrillville residents welcomed Gov. Gina Raimondo Monday night at a community meeting, where the majority voiced steadfast opposition to a proposed power plant. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

In the wake of recent mass and police shootings, Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse says Congress may be gearing up to consider more gun legislation. But, Whitehouse cautions that he has seen similar efforts fail before.

Whitehouse says he’s hopeful about legislation that would restrict people who are on anti-terrorism no-fly lists from buying guns. It's currently in limbo. Still, Whitehouse says the outlook is promising for gun control advocates.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island, including stories about addiction treatment, intellectual disabilities, medical marijuana, outdoor recreation, antibiotic resistance, and more:

Elisabeth Harrison

After announcing on Friday that 10th and 11th graders would be exempt from the state's annual standardized testing, education officials walked back the policy. The state Department of Education now says all students will have to take at least one standardized math test during high school, in either Algebra I, Algebra II or Geometry.

The state is reducing requirements for PARCC, the annual state test of English and Mathematics, in the hope that more students will take PSAT and SAT exams, which increases the likelihood of applying to college. 

Calling all literate Rhode Islanders and Ocean State ex-pats: For a great read get thee to the bookstore (or Internet if you must) and get Bruce DeSilva’s latest Rhody-centric mystery novel "The Dread Line." It goes on sale in September.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

  As drought conditions continue through parts of Rhode Island, Westerly has passed an ordinance to limit water use. The ordinance restricts water use for residents on even or odd days according to their address. Town Utilities Superintendent Paul Corina said such an ordinance is very rare.

“We haven’t had a restriction like this since 2002,” said Corina. “Basically our system is in very good shape, we have a lot of sources. It’s just this drought – it’s so bad.”

Corina added local businesses shouldn’t worry about the restrictions.

Courtesy Whitehouse Office

Governor Gina Raimondo meets Monday with critics and residents in Burrillville who oppose a proposed power plant. As Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse is declining to take a position on the project.

Whitehouse says his input on the proposed natural gas fired plant could hinder a local decision.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence Chief Operating Officer Brett Smiley will take over as Gov. Gina Raimondo's chief of staff, following the departure of Stephen Neuman, who stepped down to work on Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Smiley joins Raimondo’s team after working for Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza as the city’s chief operating officer since 2015.

RIPR FILE

 

A new analysis of executive compensation at state universities shows the University of Rhode Island trailing much of New England.  The Chronicle of Higher Education looked at state college president salaries across the country in fiscal year 2015. URI’s David Dooley made $330,000 that year, less than any other president of a flagship university in New England, except the University of Maine.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

Wikimedia Commons

The French Alliance of Newport expressed sadness after the deadly attack in Nice, France, which claimed the lives of more than 80 people. Crowds were mowed down by a truck during outdoor celebrations of Bastille Day in the coastal city, a vacation destination for many tourists.

French Alliance of Newport spokeswoman Polly Lyman said she found out about the attack following a local celebration of Bastille Day.

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The Rhode Island Department of Education has announced a new testing policy that should come as welcome news for many high school students. Under the new rules, 10th and 11th graders no longer have to take annual standardized tests of English and Mathematics.

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