News

Providence lawyer Sally Dowling has been appointed to chair the Rhode Island Judicial Nominating Commission by Gov. Gina Raimondo, the governor announced today.

Dowling, a lawyer at the Adler, Pollock and Sheehan law firm, has a long resume of public service in Rhode Island and was a onetime policy director for former Republican Gov. Edward DiPrete.

Dowling replaces Louise Durfee, whose term has expired.

``Sally’s years of experience in the legal field will be a tremendous asset to the commission,’’ said Raimondo in a statement..

Providence Dioceses

Update: In an interview with Rhode Island Public Radio, RI state Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, D-Newport, said she does not support Bishop Thomas Tobin's call to resists the U.S. Supreme Court gay marriage decision. Paiva Weed is a practicing Catholic and was an opponent of the 2013 measure that legalized same-sex marriage in Rhode Island. But in a taping for RIPR's political roundtable that will air tomorrow morning, the Senate president said the U.S. Constitution must be obeyed.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Buddy Cianci withdrew more than $200,000 in contributions and interest from his Providence pension fund last November. The move means Cianci will forgo his city pension.

Cianci took roughly $209,000 in contributions and interest out of his retirement account last November. The move came shortly after he lost his attempt to return to City Hall to Democrat Jorge Elorza. Cianci has repeatedly said he would not apply for a Providence pension.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The Rhode Island Blood Center will lay off 60 people by this fall. That’s to help cover the cost of screening for a tick-borne disease that’s on the rise in Rhode Island: babesiosis.

Babesiosis  causes flu-like symptoms in some, but it can be life-threatening for the elderly or people with weak immune systems. It spreads through tick bites and blood transfusions. It's become the top transfusion-transmitted disease in the country, and it's endemic in Rhode Island.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Signs

Jun 30, 2015

Many years ago my wife and I took a late afternoon hike in a nearby forest. We sauntered through the dense woods with our then-infant daughter nestled in the pack on my back.  We lost track of time and suddenly noticed that the sun was setting far earlier than we expected.  We were out of infant formula.  Despite our usually reliable sense of direction, we discovered we were truly lost in the forest.  Eventually we found our way out, but not without a sense of panic.  What a metaphor that experience became, teaching me about the profound importance of subtle signs in life’s proverbial forest, instincts shared by John Minahan.

John Minahan teaches English and Psychology at the Lincoln School in Providence.  Minahan is a former professional musician and college instructor who lives in Providence.  

Pages