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Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and family were spotted in Rhode Island this weekend. The Clintons visited Westerly where they stopped into a local bookstore.

The cashier on duty wasn’t expecting a visit from one of the world’s most famous families. But the Clintons walked into the Savoy Bookshop and Café on Sunday. Savoy’s Annie Philbrick says they did some shopping.

“The whole family came in, Hillary and Bill, and Chelsea and her husband and their daughter, and bought a wide selection of adults’ books and kids’ books.”

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin will once again try to make drunk driving penalties more stringent in the Ocean State. 

Kilmartin’s office says he has filed legislation for the past five years to try to stiffen sentencing and intends to do so again this legislative session. He wants drivers who kill someone while under the influence to face a maximum of 30, up from 15, years in prison. And drivers who injure someone while intoxicated would face increased penalties as well. That’s a provision the American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island has opposed in the past.

John Bender / RIPR

More than 100 people gathered inside the Statehouse Monday, to continue demonstrations against some of the policies proposed by President-elect Donald Trump. Organizers collected signatures on letters addressed to several of Rhode Island’s most powerful lawmakers.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Low income Rhode Islanders who seek help from emergency food banks are still going hungry. That’s according to a new report from the Rhode Island Community Food Bank. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

University of Connecticut journalism professor Mike Stanton, a former Providence Journal investigative reporter, sat down to talk about President-elect Donald Trump and the media. Stanton is also a board member of the New England First Amendment Coalition.

RIPR FILE

An earthquake election left Republicans in control of Congress and the White House. How will Democrats respond? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay posed the question to Sen. Jack Reed, the senior Rhode Island member of Congress.

Trump-world continues to assemble before our eyes, even as America prepares to pause next week for Thanksgiving. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome and you can follow through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

John Bender / RIPR

The state is back in court Friday for a hearing as environmental officials battle a scrap metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront. The state is asking a Superior Court judge to declare Rhode Island Recycled Metals in contempt for willfully violating court orders.

House Majority Leader Joseph Shekarchi joins Bonus Q&A to discuss his new leadership role and a range of other issues.

RIPR FILE

Hundreds of Brown University students walked out of classes Wednesday, shouting “Our existence is resistance,” and “Whose campus? Our campus.”

The protest was one of many popping up on college campuses across the nation, in the wake of Republican Donald Trump’s election as president.

At the University of Rhode Island, students and some faculty held a demonstration earlier this week. At Brown, demonstrators called for the school to provide safe harbor for undocumented immigrants and minority groups who report feeling unsafe after the election.

John Bender / RIPR

The state Board of Elections Wednesday night declined a request to delay the certification of votes in a high-profile legislative race. 

John Bender

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza hosted residents Wednesday night concerned about the future under President-elect Donald Trump. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Sen. Josh Miller (D-Cranston) has had a front row seat during the implementation of Obamacare in Rhode Island. Now, the prospect of a Trump presidency is creating uncertainty among proponents of the law. 

The state Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday to raise tuition at Rhode Island’s three public colleges and universities. The increases would be small, but they will still have an impact on students and their families, and on state efforts to increase the number of college graduates.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In a sign that the 11-member Republican cohort in the House will take a more combative tone, Rep. Patricia Morgan (R-West Warwick) has won a narrow vote to succeed Brian Newberry as House minority leader.

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