NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
7:08 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Texas Appears To Step Back From Proposal To Sell Alcohol At Some Gun Shows

A customer checks out a shotgun at a store in College Station, Texas.
Pat Sullivan AP

The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission appears to be backing away from a proposal to allow the sale of alcohol at some gun shows.

On Friday, the staff of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission recommended that commissioners vote to withdraw the plan.

NPR's John Burnett filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Read more
Politics
6:29 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Anticipating Attacks, GOP Campaigns Focus On Courting Women Voters

In this ad from Republican Stewart Mills, his wife Heather says he dons pink heels each year to raise money for victims of domestic violence.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 10:57 pm

At the Democratic party's annual Women's Leadership Forum Friday, Hillary Clinton delivered a message that could have come straight from the script being used by Democratic candidates all over the country.

Read more
Goats and Soda
6:25 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Social Media Get The Right Stuff To India's Flood Victims

An Indian Kashmiri man in Srinagar uses a rope to cross over floodwaters in early September.
Punit Paranjpe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:55 pm

When the floods hit the state of Jammu and Kashmir in the first week of September, Delhi resident Raheel Khursheed was preparing to visit his hometown, Anantnag.

"By the middle of the week I realized that it's not going to stop raining through most of the week, and I started to put my plans on hold," says the 31-year-old New Delhi resident, who directs news, politics and government at Twitter India. "By Friday, Anantnag was flooded."

Read more
Goats and Soda
6:13 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Inside An Ebola Kit: A Little Chlorine And A Lot Of Hope

Chlorine can stop the Ebola virus. So medical workers disinfect their hands often at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:52 pm

American doctor and Ebola survivor Kent Brantly had senators in Congress riveted this week, as he told them the story of a patient named Francis.

Francis lived in Liberia's capital, and as he lay dying of Ebola, he told Brantly he knew how he had gotten infected: while helping a sick neighbor into a taxi.

Read more
Goats and Soda
5:45 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Sierra Leone: Where Colin Powell Felt His Roots

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:04 pm

The media are focused on Sierra Leone this weekend, as the Ebola-embattled nation has set up a three-day lockdown to help control the disease.

Aid will be coming from the United Kingdom, which once ruled the West African nation. But the country also played a painful role in U.S. history, dating back to the dark days of slavery. Thousands from that part of Africa were captured, enslaved and sent to the sprawling rice plantations of Georgia and South Carolina.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

WATCH: First Guy In Perth To Get Hands On New iPhone Drops It On Live TV

A customer picks up his just-bought iPhone.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 7:09 pm

This morning, tech geeks around the world lined up outside Apple stores to get their hands on the latest iteration of the company's smartphone.

Read more
Book Reviews
5:27 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

For The Autumnal Equinox, A Poem As Chilling As The Fall Weather

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:08 pm

This time of year always reminds me of a wonderfully autumnal poem called "How to Like It," by Stephen Dobyns. Set in "the first days of fall," the poem describes a man whose summer seems long over: Old memories weigh on him, and new adventures feel just out of reach.

Read more
National Security
5:13 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Should The U.S. Pay Ransom For ISIS Hostages?

American Joshua Fattal was released in 2011 from Iran after the Sultan of Oman paid more than $400,000 in ransom. He now says the U.S. should bail its citizens out abroad.
Mohammed Mahjoub AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:08 pm

It was three years ago that Joshua Fattal tasted freedom again. Fattal was one of three Americans who were seized as they hiked in Iraqi Kurdistan near the Iranian border. He was held for 26 months by the Tehran government, charged with spying. His release came as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to the United States.

"I was released while Ahmadinejad was visiting the U.N. for the U.N. General Assembly, and it was really just a publicity stunt and I could tell what they were doing was a response to pressure," says Fattal.

Read more
Sports
5:13 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell: 'I Got It Wrong'

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
4:30 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

British Ambassador To U.S. Says Scottish Vote Is 'Decisive'

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 6:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages