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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Tue August 20, 2013

UPDATE: No Decision Yet On Egyptian Aid, White House Says

Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the constitutional court in Cairo.
Al Youm Elsabaa newspaper EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 2:02 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We put a new top on this post at 11:50 a.m. ET and added a new development being reported by the AP at 2 p.m. ET.)

The Obama administration is still reviewing U.S. assistance to Egypt and it's incorrect to say that such aid has been "secretly" put on hold, the White House said Tuesday.

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Animals
6:38 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Obamas Welcome New Puppy To The White House

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of a new member of the First Family. Bo may be the first dog but he's no longer the only dog. He now has a sister - Sunny. She's just over a year old and, like Bo, she's a Portuguese water dog. She'll likely join Bo in some official duties like greeting kids at the annual Easter egg hunt. The White House blog says Sunny was born in Michigan. And we'll believe that, after we see the birth certificate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:34 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Ball State Students Wins Free Tuition For Spring Semester

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana has an annual basketball challenge for incoming freshmen: Hit a shot from half court, win free tuition for a semester. No one had ever done it until this year. Markus Burden was picked randomly from the crowd. He missed twice and then sunk the shot.

He told the college paper this gives his family more financial breathing room. His mom told him to enjoy all of this attention - briefly - then hit the books.

Author Interviews
6:23 am
Tue August 20, 2013

'Southern League': Birmingham Barons Break Racial Divide

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pro baseball hasn't done much to inspire lately, think doping. But here is a story that might restore your faith in the good of the game.

(APPLAUSE)

GREENE: In Alabama earlier this season, the Minor League Birmingham Barons welcomed back some veteran players from a seminal year in the team's and the city's history.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: And now, ladies and gentlemen, doing our first pitch tonight, our 1964 Barons.

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Business
5:54 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Older Farmers Seem To Be In No Hurry To Call It Quits

Farmers are getting older. In the last census taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 25 percent of farm operators were more than 65 years old. Neighbors and younger farmers would like to have their land. But for a variety of reasons, it's hard to convince an older farmer to give it up.

Asia
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former Leader Musharraf Charged In Bhutto's Death

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. A dramatic turn of events in Pakistan this morning where a court has indicted the country's former military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, in the murder of Benazir Bhutto. Bhutto was an internationally known name and a popular former prime minister of Pakistan who was making a political comeback in 2007 when she was assassinated at a campaign rally.

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Around the Nation
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Researchers Use Genetic History To Answer Mutation Questions

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the American Southwest, a rare genetic disorder known as the Common Hispanic Mutation has haunted those of Spanish descent for nearly 400 years. It's been called "El Frio," or the cold. Now, to understand the disease, researchers in New Mexico are digging into the genetic history of residents. From member station KUNM in Albuquerque, Tristan Ahtone reports.

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History
5:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Environment
2:57 am
Tue August 20, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

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U.S.
2:56 am
Tue August 20, 2013

One By One, California Agents Track Down Illegally Owned Guns

Firearms seized during a sweep by the Los Angeles Police Department using the California's Armed Prohibited Persons System initiative. The program uses a database to identify gun owners who are no longer allowed to possess a firearm.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:57 am

In California, officials are ramping up a unique program that identifies and seizes guns from people who are prohibited from keeping them. Under state law, a legally registered gun owner loses the right to own a firearm when he or she is convicted of a crime or becomes mentally ill.

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