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Economy
2:12 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Taxes Without Returns: Pipe Dream Or Possibility?

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. Imagine April 15 but without tax returns, without the mad scramble to finish them, the long wait at the post office, the piles of receipts piling up for deductible expenses, in other words an America without tax returns.

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Author Interviews
2:05 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Pretending To Be A 'Good Nurse,' Serial Killer Targeted Patients

In a new book, Charles Graeber tells the story of Charlie Cullen, a registered nurse who was was dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media after he was implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients.
Twelve Books

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:55 pm

In 2003, police in Somerset County, N.J., arrested a hospital nurse named Charlie Cullen who was suspected of injecting patients with lethal doses of a variety of medications. Cullen would turn out to be one of the nation's most prolific serial killers, murdering dozens, perhaps hundreds of people in nine hospitals over a 16-year period.

Journalist Charles Graeber spent six years investigating the Cullen case, and is the only reporter to have spoken with Cullen in prison. In his new book, The Good Nurse, Graeber pieces together the elements of Cullen's story.

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Opinion
2:01 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Op-Ed: What Exhumation Means For A Legacy

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

But now to The Opinion Page. A week ago today, Chilean authorities exhumed the remains of Pablo Neruda, a poet, politician and diplomat who penned thousands of works, some of them like "Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair" almost ubiquitous in Hispanic culture. For nearly 40 years, it's been generally accepted that Neruda died of cancer, but some still insist Neruda was actually poisoned just days after General Augusto Pinochet came to power.

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Law
2:01 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Life After Exoneration, For The Victims On Both Sides

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. In the summer of 2002, Brian Banks was a promising high school football player with a verbal agreement to play college ball on a scholarship at USC. But when another student accused him of rape, that all changed.

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Digital Life
2:01 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

What The Bitcoin Boom Could Mean For Online Commerce

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:33 pm

Bitcoins are a digital currency, attractive to those who prefer not to leave a paper trail when they buy and sell things online. Over the past two years, the Bitcoin community has widely expanded and the value of the currency has fluctuated wildly.

NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Emeli Sande's 'Version Of Events'

Emeli Sande's debut album Our Version of Events
Simon Emmett/ Lauren Dukoff The Fun Star

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 17, 2013.

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Remains Sent From Vietnam To Hawaii May Be Those Of U.S. Service Member

Vietnam has sent what analysts believe could be the remains of a member of the American military who died in the country during the Vietnam War. After a repatriation ceremony at the airport in Da Nang Sunday, the remains were sent to Hawaii for examination and possible identification.

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Children's Health
1:18 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

The Doctor Trying To Solve The Mystery Of Food Allergies

matsou iStockPhoto

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:05 pm

No one is certain why food allergies are on the rise. By now nearly 15 million Americans have a food allergy, ranging from moderate to severe. One of every 13 children has one. Nuts, soy, milk, egg, wheat and shellfish are some of the foods that most commonly set off allergic reactions. In some cases, the reaction can be so severe that it results in the throat swelling up and closing, leading to death. For a child with a severe food allergy, every meal that isn't made under appropriate supervision can be hazardous.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Oh, Yeah! Kool-Aid Man Gets A Makeover And A Personality

The new Kool-Aid Man.
PR Newswire

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:22 pm

Smashing through walls and yelling "Oh, Yeah!" apparently aren't cool enough for Kool-Aid Man anymore.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

European Union Report Details Growth Of Human Trafficking

EU Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmström said Monday that "trafficking in human beings is all around us, closer than we think."
European Union

More than 23,600 people were victims of human trafficking in Europe during a recent three-year period, according to a new European Union report that says the problem is growing worse. Its authors say the official figures do not come close to describing the crime, which has "hundreds of thousands of victims."

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