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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Minnesota Selected As Host Of Super Bowl LII

The NFL has selected Minnesota as the host of Super Bowl LII in 2018.

The NFL reports:

"Keeping with its tradition of rewarding teams with new a stadium, NFL owners announced Tuesday it awarded Super Bowl LII to the Minnesota Vikings.

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Global Temperatures Tied Record High Last Month

Worldwide temperatures were once again above normal last month, tying the record for the hottest April set back in 2010.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Tuesday said the average global temperature for land and sea was 56.7 degrees Fahrenheit, which is 1.39 degrees warmer than the 20th century average.

"The last below-average April was April 1976, and the last average or below-average temperature for any month was February 1985," according to NOAA.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Coup Or Not, It's Business As Usual For Most Thais

Residents stop to take a photo of themselves at a military checkpoint in central Bangkok on Tuesday. Thailand's army declared martial law in a surprise move it says is aimed at quelling political unrest.
Kiko Rosario AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:29 pm

Despite Thailand's declaration of martial law in what the army said was an effort to end political unrest, most Thais were going about life as normal.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Catching Up With Michelle Chamuel Of 'The Voice'

Michelle Chamuel is pictured in the cover photo for her single "Go Down Singing." (Courtesy)

Tonight is the season finale of NBC’s hit singing competition, “The Voice.” That means it’s been about a year since Michelle Chamuel came in second, after her breakout run on the fourth season of the show.

Chamuel was a huge fan favorite, with her big black-framed glasses that inspired the hashtag #foureyesontheprize.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

NIH: Scientists Must Include Female Animals In Testing

The National Institutes of Health will soon begin requiring scientists to test new drugs on both male and female animals. Researchers now tend to use mostly male animals in pre-clinical tests, even for drugs that will also be used by women.

But that has had some major consequences for women.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

How Saudi Arabia Is Responding To MERS Crisis

The World Health Organization is seriously worried about Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). It has killed 126 people in Saudi Arabia since it was first identified two years ago.

The BBC’s Zubeida Malik brought us this report about how the country is responding to the crisis.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Federal Judge Strikes Down Pennsylvania's Ban On Gay Marriage

A federal judge struck down Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage on Tuesday, saying it violated the Constitution's Equal Protection clause.

The ruling comes a day after another federal judge used similar reasoning to strike down Oregon's ban on gay marriage.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Led Zeppelin Sued Over 'Stairway To Heaven' Guitar Line

Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, and John Bonham of Led Zeppelin, in 1970. A new lawsuit says the group borrowed from another band's work without crediting it, for the huge hit "Stairway to Heaven."
Roger Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:47 pm

Did a band from Los Angeles get ripped off by Led Zeppelin? That's the claim in a new lawsuit by representatives of the band Spirit, which played some dates with the British rock legends in their early days in America.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

North Carolina Union Seeks To Enlist College Athletes

The State Employees Association of North Carolina has invited athletes at the state's 17 public universities to enroll in the union as state employees.

The move follows a National Labor Relations Board ruling in March that athletes at Northwestern University are employees of the school and are therefore entitled to form a union.

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Parallels
1:36 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

25 Years On, Mothers Of Tiananmen Square Dead Seek Answers

A young woman is caught between civilians and Chinese soldiers, who were trying to remove her from an assembly near the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, June 3, 1989. A deadly crackdown on pro-democracy protesters who had been occupying Tiananmen Square began the next day.
Jeff Widener AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:36 pm

The elderly woman carefully handed over the tissue-thin white paper slip. The flimsy invoice was her son's death notice. The words hurriedly scrawled on it in blue ink — "shot outside and died" — were proof to her of the crimes of the state.

Zhang Xianling's son, Wang Nan, was just 19 years old when he was killed by a single bullet to the head. It was fired by martial law troops sent to clear protesters from Tiananmen Square in the early hours of June 4, 1989.

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