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3:31 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

What Happens To The Junk Donated To Charity

Every morning St. Vincent de Paul auctions off donations that won't sell at the store. (Peter O'Dowd/KJZZ)

Donations of unwanted clothes keep hundreds of millions of pounds of trash out of local landfills. But, in the end, a lot of the contributions that charities like Goodwill and the Salvation Army receive are basically garbage.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Peter O'Dowd of KJZZ tells us what happens to the stuff that doesn’t sell in thrift stores.

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The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

The Turkish Mine Disaster: How Could It Happen?

Miners rest Thursday during a break in the rescue operation after a mine explosion near Soma, Turkey.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 5:08 pm

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has enraged families of the victims of the Soma mine disaster by characterizing mining accidents as "ordinary things."

In fact, the disaster appears to have ordinary causes familiar to mining experts, who note that well-known precautions exist to prevent the kind of explosion that killed so many in Turkey.

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It's All Politics
2:50 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

In Idaho, A Debate Like You've Never Seen Before

The four candidates for Idaho governor (left) at Wednesday's GOP gubernatorial debate. The debate was held at Idaho Public Television studios.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 5:45 pm

Wednesday's GOP gubernatorial primary debate in Idaho should carry a disclaimer: NOT a Saturday Night Live skit.

It was that amazing.

And it had nothing to do with the ongoing conflict between the Tea Party and the Republican establishment.

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The Two-Way
2:46 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Chinese Nationals Flee Vietnam As Unrest Intensifies

Chinese nationals stand by their belongings after crossing to Cambodia from Vietnam at the Bavet international checkpoint in Svay Rieng province, on Thursday. Hundreds of Chinese are fleeing the country as unrest escalates.
Samrang Pring Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 6:09 pm

A second day of violence in Vietnam has seen mobs singling out Chinese workers for attack, killing at least one and injuring dozens, as hundreds of Chinese nationals fled the country by land and air. A major foreign-owned steel operation was set ablaze in the country's north.

The unrest has been sparked by China's efforts to deploy an oil platform in disputed waters in the South China Sea, putting tensions on boil and spreading fear of a possible conflict between the neighboring countries that fought a brief border war in 1979.

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Shots - Health News
2:18 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Medicine Needs More Research On Female Animals, NIH Says

Sex can matter, whether you're looking at drug side effects, the response to treatment, or the progression of a disease.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 3:22 pm

Many potential new drugs look like they could be big winners — at least when judged by how well they work in mice or other lab animals. Over the years, there have been a number of promising cancer "cures," possible Alzheimer's treatments, and candidate drugs for holding back the ravages of various degenerative diseases.

But, time after time, these great promises fade away once the potential treatments are tried in people. There are lots of reasons for that. Humans aren't rodents, for starters.

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Wisdom Watch
12:37 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Betty Reid Soskin, 92, is the oldest active full-time National Park Service ranger in the United States. She and her colleagues at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park are preparing to unveil new permanent exhibits at the park on May 24.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:26 pm

As 92-year-old Betty Reid Soskin helped hash out plans for a new national park 13 years ago, this is what stuck in her mind: "What gets remembered is a function of who's in the room doing the remembering."

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Shots - Health News
12:21 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

For Some Doctors, Almost All Medicare Patients Are Above Average

Tom Hoyle ProPublica

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:47 am

Office visits are the bread and butter of many physicians' practices. Medicare pays for more than 200 million of them a year, often to deal with routine problems like colds or high blood pressure. Most require relatively modest amounts of a doctor's time or medical know-how.

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Science
12:18 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Why This Octopus Isn't Stuck-Up

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:18 pm

Octopus arms keep from getting all tangled up in part because some kind of chemical in octopus skin prevents the tentacles' suckers from grabbing on.

That was the surprise discovery of scientists who were trying to understand how octopuses manage to move all their weird appendages without getting tied in knots.

Unlike humans, octopuses don't have a constant awareness of their arms' locations. It's kind of like the eight arms have minds of their own. And as an octopus arm travels through the water, its neighboring arms are constantly in reach.

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All Tech Considered
12:07 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Solar-Powered Bike Lock Aims To Be The Airbnb Of Bike-Sharing

The Skylock is solar-powered and can send messages to let a bike owner know if it's being tampered with.
Skylock

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:32 pm

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Submit it with this form.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Thu May 15, 2014

FCC Gives Initial OK To New Internet Traffic Rules

Demonstrators protest outside the Federal Communications Commission Thursday. The agency voted to open new proposed rules for public comment, including a discussion of whether "paid prioritization" should be banned.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 5:40 pm

New rules for how Internet traffic is governed were officially unveiled and approved for public comment following a 3-2 vote Thursday by members of the Federal Communications Commission.

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