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Parallels
7:36 am
Sun May 11, 2014

The Squabble That Never Ends: Britain and Spain Duel Over Gibraltar

The Rock of Gibraltar, as seen from the Spanish town of La Linea de la Concepcion, at Spain's southern tip. Gibraltar has been British territory for 301 years, but many Spaniards want it back. Fresh squabbles over fishing rights cropped up recently.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 1:37 pm

One recent morning, a mile-long line of cars waited to cross the international border separating Spain from Britain's Rock of Gibraltar. Spanish border guards were stopping every car, resulting in long lines that could take up to six hours to cross.

Spain said it was checking for tobacco smuggling across the international border. But these increased checks were Spain's retaliation in a spat over fishing rights and access to nearby waters, said Brian Reyes, news editor at the local newspaper, the Gibraltar Chronicle.

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Business
5:40 am
Sun May 11, 2014

On Income Inequality: A French Economist Vs. An American Capitalist

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 9:11 am

Picture a cozy cafe. At a small table, an economics professor from Paris is chatting with a wealthy businessman from New York.

As they sip coffee, they discuss economic history, and often nod and agree.

Then, as they stand to leave, each states a conclusion drawn from their conversation. But what they say is exactly, completely opposite.

One says economic history proves governments must impose very heavy taxes to break up concentrations of wealth. The other says governments should cut taxes to encourage wealthy people to pursue even bigger profits.

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:33 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Did Homer Simpson Actually Solve Fermat's Last Theorem? Take A Look

Numberphile YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:18 am

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The Two-Way
5:02 am
Sun May 11, 2014

Eastern Ukraine Wraps Up Vote On Independence; Clashes Reported

Patients at a hospital cast ballots in a referendum on Sunday in Mariupol, Ukraine.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 4:19 pm

(This post was updated at 3:55 p.m. ET.)

Residents of two fractious regions of eastern Ukraine wrapped up voting on Sunday in a controversial referendum over independence from the central government in Kiev.

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The Two-Way
7:29 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Rams Pick Michael Sam, First Openly Gay Player Drafted In NFL

Michael Sam runs a drill at the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis in February. Sam was picked in the seventh round of the NFL draft by the St. Louis Rams.
Michael Conroy AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 12:09 pm

In the seventh round of the NFL draft, the St. Louis Rams picked Michael Sam, making him the first openly gay player to be drafted by a pro football team.

Sam, who played for Missouri in college, came out earlier this year in media interviews with ESPN and The New York Times. His team and coaches knew his sexual orientation before the interviews, but kept it private for his final college season.

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Sports
6:40 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

Lance Armstrong (left) and Tyler Hamilton compete in the 90th Tour de France in 2003. Hamilton later testified in the doping case brought against Armstrong and the U.S. Postal cycling team.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 7:59 pm

As the Giro d'Italia bicycle race sets off in Ireland this weekend, the shadow of doping will not be far behind. In a competition to beat the cheaters, scientists are constantly trying to improve drug testing.

While it can be hard for regulators to keep up with new habits, when an athlete is finally caught doping, the result can be revolutionary.

Performance-enhancing drugs have plagued the sport of cycling for years, with Lance Armstrong at the center of the scandal. But he was not alone.

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Music Interviews
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Atmosphere's Seventh Album: Representing 'Southsiders'

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:03 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

When the hip-hop dual Atmosphere got their start back in the mid-'90s, mainstream rap was dominated by a harder, aggressive sound, think Dr. Dre or Notorious B-I-G. By contrast, with their spare production and tight, introspective lyrics, Atmosphere was something different.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Asia
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Conflicts Over Resources With China's Neighbors Have Deeper Motives

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

The View From Homs: Watching The Withdrawal Of Syria's Rebels

On Friday, the Syrian government evacuated the last of the rebel fighters from Homs, following a cease-fire agreement. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.

History
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

A group of Asian-Americans, including descendants of Chinese railroad workers, recreated an iconic photo on the 145th anniversary of the first transcontinental railroad's completion at Promontory Summit, Utah.
Courtesy of Corky Lee

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:55 pm

East finally met West 145 years ago on America's first transcontinental railroad.

The symbolic hammering of a golden spike at Promontory Summit, Utah, completed the connection between the country's two coasts and shortened a cross-country trip of more than six months down to a week.

Much of the building was done by thousands of laborers brought in from China, but their faces were left out of photographs taken on that momentous day.

Over the years, one photograph in particular from May 10, 1869, has taken root in U.S. history.

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