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Education
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

U.S. Tests Teens A Lot, But Worldwide, Exam Stakes Are Higher

Students in Manchester, England, celebrate the results of their college entrance exams.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 7:06 pm

High school students in the U.S. take lots of standardized tests. There are state tests, new Common Core-aligned field tests, and an alphabet soup of others like the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) and NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) exams, the SAT, ACT, AP and IB.

It's a lot by any objective measure. Parents and teens often charge that America tests its students more than any other nation in the world. But really, how does the U.S.'s test tally compare with what kids are taking elsewhere in the world?

England

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Sports
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

What About Donald Sterling's Right To Privacy?

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling (center) has been banned by the NBA; he is seen here watching a Clippers game with V. Stiviano in 2011.
Danny Moloshok AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:46 am

You can't forget what you've heard with your own ears.

Thanks to the widespread broadcast of his beliefs on race, the disgrace of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling is now cemented, and the NBA is seeking to force him to sell the team.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver acknowledged as much at a news conference Tuesday, during which he announced that Sterling was banned from the league for life for his remarks on race.

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Sports
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

How The NBA Might Ensure Sterling Sells The Clippers

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

A day after NBA commissioner Adam Silver banned Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life and made clear his intention to force Sterling to sell the team, the question remains, just how will Silver do that?

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Train Carrying Crude Oil Derails In Downtown Lynchburg, Va.

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 5:25 am

A CSX train carrying crude oil derailed in Lynchburg, Va., on Wednesday.

Luann Hunt, a spokeswoman for the city of Lynchburg, tells our Newscast unit that the area has been evacuated.

Approximately 12 to 14 tanker cars were involved in the derailment, Hunt said, causing flames and deep dark smoke.

Beverly Amsler, of NPR member station WVTF, tells us that at least three of the tankers ruptured because of the accident.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:34 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Coming Soon To Colorado: Wolfgang And Weed

The Colorado Symphony's Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration concert at Red Rocks Amphitheatre outside Denver last summer. If you squint, you can see a cloud of something that's probably not pot smoke.
Matt Korona Courtesy of the Colorado Symphony

Colorado Symphony patrons — if they aren't already — are about to have the option of being Rocky Mountain high.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Oklahoma Governor Calls For Review Of Botched Execution

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:06 pm

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has ordered an "independent review" of the state's execution procedures and halted any further executions until the review is complete.

The move comes a day after Oklahoma botched the execution of Clayton D. Lockett. As we reported, after a long legal and political battle, the state proceeded with Lockett's execution using a novel combination of drugs.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Mars Rover Takes A Break To Drill A Hole

The rover has drilled a hole in sandstone. It will soon collect samples to learn more about how the rocks formed.
NASA/Caltech/JPL

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 3:33 pm

NASA's Curiosity rover is on an epic trip to a distant mountain, but it took a brief break Wednesday to dip its drill into the Martian soil.

The drilling is taking place at a place called Waypoint Kimberley. The area is a point of convergence for several different types of terrain, says John Grotzinger, the rover's project scientist. The exposed rock and different formations made the way point a good place to "stop and smell the roses," he says.

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The Salt
3:07 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Smiting The Mite To Save The Bees (And The Crops They Pollinate)

Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields.
Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:05 pm

How do you like them apples, apricots, blueberries, almonds and peaches? They all depend on bees for pollination.

But over the last several years, a massive number of bee colonies have died, putting beekeepers, farmers and scientists in a bit of a panic.

They've come up with a lot of reasons why colonies are collapsing and dwindling.

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Shots - Health News
2:32 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Cancer Plus Chemo Might Put Your Job At Risk

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 2:47 pm

Imagine that you've just been told you have cancer. The good news is that it's early stage. Still, your doctor believes a course of chemotherapy would boost your survival odds.

Then this week you read the headline, "Chemo for breast cancer increases unemployment risk."

What are you supposed to do now?

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The Fresh Air Interview
2:27 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

At 90, 'Fiddler' Lyricist Tells His Story

Sheldon Harnick (right) with the late Jerry Bock, his long-time musical collaborator. Together they worked on musicals like Fiddler on the Roof and Fiorello!
Astrid Stawiarz Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:13 am

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