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Afghanistan
6:04 am
Fri April 4, 2014

2 AP Journalists Shot By Afghan Police, 1 Dies

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

The AP reports Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed. Reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded. The two were in Khost province in eastern Afghanistan ahead of Saturday's election.

Sports
5:36 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Chicago Celebrates A Century Of Baseball At Wrigley Field

The view inside Wrigley Field during a 1959 Cubs game. The stadium was built in 1914 and celebrates its centennial this year.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

When the first pitch is thrown between the Chicago Cubs and the Philadelphia Phillies on Friday, it will mark the start of the 100th professional baseball season at iconic Wrigley Field.

The ball park on Chicago's North Side, known as the Friendly Confines, opened as the home of the Chicago Federals 100 years ago this month.

The Cubs moved there two years later, and in all that time the Cubs have never won a World Series. There hasn't even been a World Series game played at Wrigley since the end of World War II.

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

David Letterman To Retire From CBS In 2015

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

David Letterman says he will retire next year. He'll leave "The Late Show" as the longest-serving late night host in network television history, even longer than Johnny Carson when you add up Letterman's time at CBS and NBC before that. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says Letterman reshaped late night TV and succeeded as an edgy outsider more interested in making fun of show business than participating in it.

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Planet Money
4:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

New Web Addresses Provide Alternatives To Crowded Domains

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:59 am
Fri April 4, 2014

App Calculates TV-Watching Time

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Tube Time.

A new app, tells you how much time you've spent watching TV.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's called tiii.me. That's tiii.me. Tell tiii.me., which shows you've watched, and the app calculates how much of your life you spent. You watched all of "Breaking Bad," that's two days and 14 hours.

WERTHEIMER: With some TV, of course, it's probably better not to know how much time you'll never get back.

All Tech Considered
3:14 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Twitch Boosts A New Pro Category: Video Game Player

"I make a living attempting to beat video games on my show, and people watch," says Jayson Love, whose stage name is Man.
Twitch.tv screengrab

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 1:01 pm

It may not surprise you that Netflix uses more bandwidth at peak hours than any other company, followed by Google and Apple. No. 4 on the list, though, is Twitch.tv.

Twitch is a company devoted to live interactive broadcasting of people playing video games. It's helping to launch a new type of broadcast professional.

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Television
7:35 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dave Letterman Signals He'll Soon Put Down The Microphone

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

David Letterman, the longest-serving late night television host, is retiring.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOW, 'LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID LETTERMAN')

DAVID LETTERMAN: Sometime in the not-so-distant future, 2015 for the love of God, in fact, Paul and I will be wrapping things up and taking a hike.

SIEGEL: Letterman, who is 66, told the audience today during a taping of his late show program which will air tonight. Here to talk about David Letterman is NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. And Eric, why has Letterman decided to retire now?

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Shots - Health News
7:14 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again

Lt. Gen. Mark Milley speaks to reporters April 2 regarding the second shooting in five years on the Fort Hood Army post in Texas.
Drew Anthony Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 9:05 am

With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.

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Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape
6:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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Book Reviews
6:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dinaw Mengestu Embraces The Vastness Of Love And War

Eli Meir Kaplan Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Why do love and war go so well together in novels? It isn't only because they're both naturally dramatic themes. Sometimes, in fact, each is so big and overwhelming that they can seem beyond the grasp of words. And so a writer who tries to show the struggle of two people with deep feelings for each other, "set against a backdrop of violence" (as a novel's flap copy might read), can just seem like he's overreaching. But Dinaw Mengestu uses love and war to powerfully explore a third, equally dramatic theme: identity.

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