NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
6:34 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Alzheimer's Diagnosis Expanding To Catch Early Warning Signs

Doctors may eventually be able to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who have abnormal brain scans but who aren't yet showing behavioral symptoms of the disease.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 8:17 am

Alzheimer's disease isn't what it used to be. After 30 years of having doctors diagnose the disease by symptoms alone, researchers and advocacy groups are calling for new diagnostic criteria that recognize changes in the brain as well as changes in behavior.

The goal is to eventually allow doctors to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who do not have problems with memory or thinking, but who do have an abnormal brain scan or some other sign that the disease may be developing.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:05 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Long, Hot Winter Puts Western Fire Officials On Edge

Flames approach the Blakiston Ranch in California last May during the Springs fire. It eventually torched more than 24,000 acres.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:16 pm

The view from atop Conejo Mountain is postcard-worthy. It's 360 degrees of Southern California: mountains, coastline, cookie-cutter homes.

But if you look closer, the greens, blues and browns of Conejo are charred away, burnt a charcoal black.

Mike Lindbery, a captain with the Ventura County Fire Department, was here on this mountain last spring when a wildfire raced up the hillside on its way to torching more than 24,000 acres.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Why Ukraine's Situation Makes Russia's Other Neighbors Nervous

A column of Russian troops prepares to leave the checkpoint at a bridge over the Inguri River in Western Georgia, in October 2008, after securing the secession of Georgia's breakaway South Ossetia region.
Levan Gabechava Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:42 am

When Vladimir Putin announced the Kremlin's annexation of Crimea this week, he made it clear that the region's large Russian-speaking population made the move necessary and inevitable.

In fact, large populations of Russian speakers are common along the fringes of the old Soviet Union. Those groups are made up of a combination of indigenous people and Russians who migrated from the mother country, many as part of Soviet-era policies aimed at altering the ethnic makeup in potentially troublesome satellites.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Al-Qaida Spokesman: I Warned Bin Laden That U.S. Would Kill Him

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith appears in this still image taken from an undated video address. Abu Ghaith, one of Osama bin Laden's sons-in-law and a former spokesman for al-Qaeda, is on trial in New York.
Reuters/Landov

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, took the stand in his trial in New York on Wednesday, telling the jury that he warned the al-Qaida leader that America would "not settle until it kills you."

In the surprise testimony, Abu Ghaith recalled a conversation with bin Laden in a cave in Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

"Did you learn what happened? We are the ones who did it," Ghaith recalled, through an Arabic interpreter, his infamous father-in-law asking.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:51 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Ad For Surgical Robot Violated University of Illinois Policies

Doctors perform surgery with the da Vinci robot.
Intuitive Surgical AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:01 pm

An internal review by the University of Illinois has found that an advertisement in which a university surgical team endorsed a pricey surgical robot violated school policies.

Though the team acted "in good faith," the review concluded, the episode pointed to the need for clearer rules and stronger enforcement.

Read more
News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In First Press Conference, New Fed Chair Goes Vague

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Federal Reserve policymakers say it's not your imagination, there has been an economic slowdown over the past few months. The pullback was partly due to the harsh winter weather. And today was Fed chair Janet Yellen's first opportunity to face the Washington press corps at the end of a two-day meeting.

Read more
News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Russian Flags Fly Over Ukrainian Base — But Who Stormed It?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 9:13 pm

One year ago Pavel Rucsineanu was running out of options.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis was ravaging his lungs. And the disease had evolved into an incurable form, doctors said.

It's like an "infectious cancer," Dr. Tetru Alexandriuc said at the time. "We have no other medicines" to treat Pavel, the doctor added. Although he wouldn't say it, the doctor expected TB would kill Pavel.

Read more
News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

As Iran Talks Wrap Up, Diplomats Get Specific

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In Airliner Search, Countries Still Wonder What Parts To Play

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

FBI investigators are now joining the hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. It's one more instance of increasingly closer international cooperation in the search — though confusion persists.

Pages