NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
5:06 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Obama Launches HIV Cure Initiative, Ups Pledge For Global Health

President Obama walks into an auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building Monday for a speech about World AIDS Day.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 5:45 pm

Commemorating the 25th World AIDS Day a day late, President Obama announced an initiative Monday to find a cure for HIV infections that would be funded by $100 million shifted from existing spending.

"The United States should be at the forefront of new discoveries into how to put people into long-term remission without requiring lifelong therapies — or better yet, eliminate it completely," Obama said at a meeting in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building next to the White House.

Read more
Business
4:58 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Sluggish Start To Holiday Sales May Mean More Price Cuts

Shoppers crowd a Macy's store in New York on Thursday. Many retailers stayed open on Thanksgiving Day this year, a new holiday tradition that analysts say is here to stay.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 5:53 pm

Despite retailers offering Thanksgiving hours and more online sales, Americans still nervous about the economy spent less this long weekend than they did last year, according to preliminary estimates.

But analysts say retailers will be working harder to boost sales in coming weeks by offering even deeper discounts.

Read more
NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Investigation Of New York Train Derailment Continues

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:12 pm

Transportation officials are investigating what caused a Metro-North Railroad passenger train to derail along the Hudson River in New York on Sunday morning. The crash left four dead and injured dozens more.

NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

ACLU Sues, Claiming Catholic Hospitals Put Women At Risk

Archbishop Joseph William Tobin of Indianapolis prays at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' annual fall meeting in Baltimore on Nov. 12.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:50 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union has decided to go directly to the source of its unhappiness with the way women are treated in Catholic hospitals. It's suing the nation's Catholic bishops.

Read more
NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Ukranians Face Choice Between EU And Russia

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:12 pm

Thousands of Ukrainian protesters blockaded government buildings in Kiev Monday seeking to oust President Viktor Yanukovich. Demonstrations over the weekend drew as many as 350,000 people in the largest rally since the Orange Revolution. The protests came after Yanukovich decided to abandon a trade deal with the European Union and instead seek closer ties with Russia. Robert Siegel talks to Steven Pifer, former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, about the political landscape in the country and its relationship with Moscow.

The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Croat Group Sues Bob Dylan For Racism In France

Bob Dylan performs at Vieilles Charrues music festival on July 22, 2012, in Carhaix-Plouguer, France. The singer is being sued by a France-based Croat organization for racism.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Think twice — it may not be all right.

Bob Dylan is being sued by a France-based Croatian organization for alleged racism following an interview last year in which the music legend loosely compared Croats and Nazis.

France has strict laws against hate speech, and the Council of Croats in France says it wants an apology from Dylan.

His "comments were an incitement to hatred," Vlatko Maric, the group's secretary said, according to The Guardian.

Read more
Parallels
4:09 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

E-Readers Mark A New Chapter In The Developing World

A student at Ntimigom School in Kilgoris, Kenya, uses his e-reader.
Jon McCormack

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 4:58 pm

A former Amazon executive who helped Jeff Bezos turn shopping into a digital experience has set out to end illiteracy. David Risher is now the head of Worldreader, a nonprofit organization that brings e-books to kids in developing countries through Kindles and cellphones.

Risher was traveling around the world with his family when he got the idea for Worldreader. They were doing volunteer work at an orphanage in Ecuador when he saw a building with a big padlock on the door. He asked a woman who worked there what was inside, and she said, "It's the library."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Amazon's Drone Has Many Asking 'What Could Go Wrong?'

Buzzing to a neighborhood near you? Amazon.com's Prime Air prototype may someday fly small packages right to customers' homes.
AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 6:37 pm

The news that Amazon is hoping to one day use semi-autonomous drones to deliver small packages to customers has many asking a familiar question:

What could go wrong?

Check this tweet:

"An Amazon drone!? What could go wrong?! 'They're autonomous' - this is how the Terminator started FYI..."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:07 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

WATCH: A 'Geese Tsunami' In Canada

Hundreds of geese take flight.
YouTube

Read more
Planet Money
3:57 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Nixon And Kimchi: How The Garment Industry Came To Bangladesh

There are more than 4,000 garment factories in Bangladesh. One way or another, most of them trace their lineage to Abdul Majid Chowdhury, Noorul Quader and the 128 Bangladeshis who traveled to Korea 30 years ago.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 10:35 am

More details were added to this post after it was published. The new information was courtesy of Vidiya Khan, director of the Desh Group, and daughter of Noorul Quader.

Bangladesh was created out of chaos in the early 1970s, at a moment when millions in the country were dying from a combination of war and famine. The future looked exceedingly bleak.

Read more

Pages