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The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Egypt, Turkey Expel Each Others Ambassadors, Testing Ties

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures the four-finger salute used by supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on Saturday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 6:11 pm

The relationship between Egypt and Turkey took a big hit today, when Egypt announced it was expelling the Turkish ambassador, and Turkey responded in-kind, declaring the Egyptian ambassador "persona non grata."

The AP reports:

"Saturday's decisions, which fall short of closing diplomatic missions in the two countries, are a dramatic reversal of the warming relations between the two countries over the past year.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

FCC Chief Says He's Personally Opposed To In-Flight Phone Calls

The new head of the Federal Communications Commission says his agency is reviewing restrictions on in-flight cellphone use. Here, a passenger looks at her cellphone before a flight last month.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:36 pm

Just a day after his agency said it was reviewing "outdated and restrictive rules" banning the use of cellphones during flights, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is tempering his statement.

"We understand that many passengers would prefer that voice calls not be made on airplanes," Tom Wheeler, who was confirmed for the job in late October, said in a statement on Friday. "I feel that way myself."

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The Salt
1:46 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Pepsi Pressured To Fight Big Sugar's 'Land Grab'

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-kaiowá indigenous community in Brazil.
Tatiana Cardeal Courtesy Oxfam

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 12:15 pm

The anti-poverty group Oxfam is asking Pepsi's shareholders to approve a resolution that, if passed, would force the company to disclose its sugar suppliers and investigate whether those suppliers are implicated in "land grabs" that unfairly take land from the poor.

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National Security
1:45 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Want A File From The NSA? You Can Ask, But You Might Not Get It

Protesters march on Oct. 26 to demand that the Congress investigate the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs. Legally, the NSA can respond to many records requests from citizens with a non-committal answer.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden leaked classified information about the agency's intelligence-gathering activities last summer, the NSA has been bombarded with requests for its records.

USA Today this week said the agency received more than 2,500 requests for records from July to September, compared to about 250 from January to March.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Miami-Area Police Force Accused Of Rampant Racial Profiling

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:25 pm

Based on witness interviews, public records and surveillance video, The Miami Herald dropped a stunning story on Friday: It alleges that for years, the Miami Gardens Police Department has racially profiled the clients and employees of a convenience store in the Miami-area city.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Sat November 23, 2013

In Pakistan, Thousands Protest Against U.S. Drone Strikes

Thousands of Pakistani activists from right-wing political parties protested against U.S. drone strikes on Saturday.
A Majeed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:48 pm

Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Pakistan to protest U.S. drone strikes inside their country.

Reporting from Islamabad, NPR's Philip Reeves reports protesters blocked an important road used to carry supplies to NATO troops in Afghanistan. Philip filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Some 10,000 people turned out, brandishing flags and chanting slogans.

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Duke Energy Pleads Guilty Over Eagle Deaths At Wind Farms

A golden eagle is seen flying over a wind turbine on Duke Energy's Top of the World wind farm in Converse County, Wyo.
Dina Cappiello AP

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:30 pm

In a settlement reached with the Department of Justice, Duke Energy Renewables pleaded guilty in the deaths of 14 golden eagles and 149 other migratory birds at two of its wind energy facilities in Wyoming.

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Junkyard,' 'Great Beauty,' 'Narco Cultura,' Key And Peele

Keegan-Michael Key (left) and Jordan Peele both started their careers at Second City, Peele in Chicago and Key in Detroit.
Ian White Comedy Central

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 12:06 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
8:05 am
Sat November 23, 2013

John Kerry Joins Iran Nuclear Talks In Geneva

Secretary of State John Kerry arrives at the Geneva International airport in Geneva, Switzerland, on Saturday.
Denis Balibouse AP

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 2:22 pm

Once again raising expectations that a deal over Iran's nuclear program is at hand, Secretary of State John Kerry joined the foreign ministers of the U.K., Russia, China, France and Germany in Geneva to try to hammer out an agreement that would curb Iran's nuclear work in exchange for the loosening of some sanctions.

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Parallels
7:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Once Victims Of Stalin, Ukraine's Tatars Reassert Themselves

A Crimean Tatar man cries at a mass rally held in Simfropol, Ukraine, on May 18, 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Tatars from Crimea.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 11:18 am

In 1944, on the orders of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, the entire population of Tatars on the Crimean Peninsula was rounded up and sent to the deserts of Soviet Central Asia.

Nearly 70 years after that wartime atrocity, the Tatar population is still working to reassert itself in its homeland.

Mullah Ziyatdin, 82, was just 12 when he and his family were rousted in the middle of the night, ordered to gather a few belongings and shoved into freight cars for a nightmarish three-week journey. The freight-car doors were opened every few days.

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