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Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Oregon's State Exchange May Be Worse Than HealthCare.gov

Matthew Collier, an uninsured entrepreneur, speaks at a rally sponsored by Cover Oregon in Portland, Ore., on Oct. 1.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 9:51 am

As the federal government consumes humble pie over failures in the health insurance exchanges, some states that have set up their own exchanges are also struggling. Oregon has yet to enroll one single person, and it's been reduced to pawing through paper applications to figure out eligibility.

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The Salt
4:31 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

It's one of the most controversial practices in agriculture: feeding small amounts of antibiotics to animals in order to make them grow faster.

But what if the drugs don't even work very well?

There's some good evidence that they don't, at least in pigs. They used to deliver a boost in growth, but that effect has disappeared in recent years or declined greatly.

The reason for this is interesting and even paradoxical.

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NPR Story
4:31 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Coloradans To Vote On Schools Initiative Mixing Funding, Reforms

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tomorrow in Colorado, voters will decide on an ambitious ballot measure that would overhaul the state's public education system. It could become the first state to combine an income tax hike with education reforms all in one proposal. From Colorado Public Radio, here's Jenny Brundin.

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Shots - Health News
4:29 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Bariatric Surgery Can Keep Pounds Off For Years

Just knowing that someone is obese doesn't mean they would benefit from bariatric surgery, doctors say.
iStockphoto.com

Weight-loss surgery is becoming increasingly popular because it's the only treatment that pretty much guarantees weight loss.

There is very little evidence on how it will affect people's health over the long haul. But people who had surgery maintained substantial weight loss three years later, according to a study that's trying to figure out if it works.

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It's All Politics
4:22 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Employment Non-Discrimination Act Passes First Senate Hurdle

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., at a 2011 news conference on Capitol Hill. On Monday, Heller announced his support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 6:59 pm

Update at 6:47 p.m. Senate Passes Bill:

With a vote of 61-30, the Senate voted to move forward on legislation that would prohibit workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The vote Monday opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.

Our original post continues:

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It's All Politics
4:18 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

What If A Congressman Comes Out And Nobody Cares?

Rep. Mike Michaud talks to an Associated Press reporter Monday in Portland, Maine, about his public announcement that he is gay.
Clarke Canfield AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:43 pm

The final chapter in the history of bombshells of the closeted gay politician variety may have been written Monday by Rep. Mike Michaud, a Maine Democrat running for governor.

Michaud, 58, announced in a column published in two state newspapers and by The Associated Press that he is a gay man, and followed it with the question: "But why should it matter?"

Judging from immediate reaction in Maine, where Michaud next year will be competing to become the first governor in U.S. history elected as an openly gay man, the answer seemed to be that it probably won't.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

YouTube Launches Its First-Ever Music Awards

What if someone held an awards show with no red carpet, no fanfare, short speeches and it finished in under the projected running time?

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Organization Seeks To Preserve Slave Dwellings

Joe McGill, of the Slave Dwelling Project, at Stagville Plantation in North Carolina. (Stagville Plantation/Facebook)

There are still plenty of physical reminders of slavery today. Among them: hundreds of former slave cabins across the country.

A group called the Slave Dwelling Project sets out to identify these mostly small, dilapidated structures and bring attention to their preservation by inviting people to sleep in them.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Adding Up The Cost Of Low Literacy Among Adults

Students participate in a health literacy class at Mary's Center, role-playing a visit to the doctor. (Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU)

For the past few days, NPR has been taking a look at the challenges facing the 30 million American adults who lack basic literacy skills.

In the final part of our series on adult education, Kavitha Cardoza of member station WAMU examines the economic and social impacts — not just on individuals, but on society as a whole.

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The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Not An Earthquake: Quarry Blast Sparks Tremors In Chicago Suburbs

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 4:20 pm

Around lunchtime today, residents in Chicago's western suburbs felt the earth shake. As WLS-TV reported, they assumed it was an earthquake and the United States Geological Survey reported it as a 3.7 magnitude quake.

While rare, earthquakes do happen in this part of the country. This would have been a significant one for the area.

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