NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
4:39 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Rep. Charlie Dent: "Confident And Optimistic" Senate Deal Will Pass In House

Rep. Charlie Dent, (R-PA). (Wikipedia)

The Senate is proposing a bipartisan plan that would avoid a default and reopen the federal government, but it remains to be seen whether the Senate plan will pass in the House.

“I am confident and optimistic that the bipartisan, bicameral agreement will be adopted by the House,” Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) told Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

He says that there will probably remain stalwarts in his party who will vote against the plan, but remains confident that it will have bipartisan support in the House.

Read more
NPR Story
4:39 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Esther's Follies Take On Washington

Members of Esther's Follies, a political sketch comedy group from Austin, Texas. (Esther's Follies)

What’s happening in Washington can seem like a joke these days, and Esther’s Follies, the campy political sketch comedy troop from Austin, Texas, is raking in the material.

Interview Highlights: Shannon Sedwick and Ted Meredith

Sedwick on how their comedy show works in Austin:

Read more
NPR Story
4:39 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Picking The Gridiron Contenders

Bowl Championship Series (PlayoffPAC/Flickr)

Next season, there will be a new playoff system for big time college football.

A committee, which includes former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, will select the four teams that will play in the semifinals ahead of the championship game.

That system will replace the Bowl Championship Series which has, until now, determined which college teams play for the national championship.

Read more
The Salt
3:20 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Here's A Reason To Love Disco Again: Stopping Food Waste

Tristram Stuart, founder of Feeding the 5000, is helping to organize several disco soup events across Europe for World Food Day.
Courtesy of Feeding the 5000

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 6:33 pm

Wednesday is World Food Day, an occasion food activists like to use to call attention to world hunger. With 842 million chronically undernourished people on Earth, it's a problem that hasn't gone away.

This year, activists are trying to make the day a little spicier with pots full of disco soup to highlight the absurd amount of food thrown away that could feed people: one-third of all the food produced every year.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Family Caregiving Can Be Stressful, Rewarding And Life-Affirming

Taking care of a family member can be a life-extending experience, a study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:48 pm

The stereotype of caring for a family member is that it's so stressful it harms the caregiver's health. But that's not necessarily so.

Studies are conflicted, finding that caregiving can harm or help the caregiver. Here's one on the plus side. A study finds that people who care for a family member live longer than similar people who aren't caregiving.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Divers In Russia Dredge Up A Half-Ton Chunk Of Meteorite

People look at what scientists believe to be a chunk of the Chelyabinsk meteor, recovered from Chebarkul Lake near Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow.
Alexander Firsov AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 6:36 pm

Read more
Music Interviews
2:37 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

What Makes Paul McCartney Nervous?

Paul McCartney's latest album, New, is out now.
Mary McCartney Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 8:05 pm

Read more
Movie Interviews
2:36 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Bonham Carter Takes On Taylor, And She Did Her Homework

Helena Bonham Carter plays Elizabeth Taylor in Burton and Taylor, a BBC America movie that focuses on the famous couple's stint acting together on Broadway in 1983.
Leah Gallo BBC

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 6:39 pm

Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton were the real-life star-crossed lovers of the 1960s and '70s. No relationship better merited the adjective "tempestuous," and of none was that word more often uttered.

BBC America offers a dramatized glimpse of the relationship in its movie Burton and Taylor. The film focuses not on the couple's scandalous beginnings when they met filming the 1963 movie Cleopatra, but rather on their public curtain call as a couple, the 1983 Broadway revival of Noel Coward's play Private Lives.

Read more
The Salt
2:34 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Why U.S. Taxpayers Pay $7 Billion A Year To Help Fast-Food Workers

New York City Council speaker and then-mayoral candidate Christine Quinn speaks at a fast-food workers' protest outside a McDonald's in New York in August. A nationwide movement is calling for raising the minimum hourly wage for fast-food workers to $15.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:48 pm

If you hit the drive-through, chances are that the cashier who rings you up or the cook who prepared your food relies on public assistance to make ends meet.

A new analysis finds that 52 percent of fast-food workers are enrolled in, or have their families enrolled in, one or more public assistance programs such as SNAP (food stamps) Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Read more
It's All Politics
1:56 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Good Cop, Bad Cop Routine Gets A Result For Obama And Reid

President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., shared the same goals but had notable stylistic differences in their approaches to the fiscal fight.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:40 pm

Since the start of the fiscal standoff that led to a government shutdown and a flirtation with a historic debt default, Democrats have been led by the tag team of President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

At times, their tactics resembled the good cop, bad cop routine where one officer offers the suspect a cup of coffee and the other smacks it from the suspect's lips. Reid, of course, is the smacker.

Read more

Pages