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12:03 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

One-Stop Shop: Jeff Bezos Wants You To Buy 'Everything' On Amazon

An employee walks through an aisle at Amazon.com's 1.2 million-square foot fulfillment center in Phoenix, Ariz., in November 2012.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:51 pm

In his new book The Everything Store, Brad Stone chronicles how Amazon became an "innovative, disruptive, and often polarizing technology powerhouse." He writes that Amazon was among the first to realize the potential of the Internet and that the company "ended up forever changing the way we shop and read."

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Collectible Art At Street Prices: Banksy Sells Pieces For $60

An image from a video posted by Banksy shows a man representing the artist staffing a sidewalk stall featuring signed works for $60. Banksy says he only made $420 Saturday, with one customer negotiating a 2-for-1 discount.
Banksy NY YouTube

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Reid And McConnell Cite 'Progress' As Default Deadline Looms

Still Right Twice A Day: Visitors look at the Ohio Clock outside the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill Sunday. The clock that has stood watch over the Senate for 196 years stopped running shortly after noon Wednesday. Employees who wind the clock weekly were furloughed in the federal shutdown.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:34 pm

This post was last updated at 6:10 p.m. ET.

The House and Senate were in session on Columbus Day, the 14th day of the federal government shutdown. A meeting that had been arranged between President Obama, Vice President Biden and the four main leaders of Congress was postponed, as the White House cited the progress being made in negotiations.

The latest word of a possible deal calls for raising the federal debt limit through Feb. 15 and funding a return to work for the government through Jan. 15. We'll update this post as more news comes in.

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Code Switch
10:15 am
Mon October 14, 2013

How Columbus Sailed Into U.S. History, Thanks To Italians

Though he sailed in 1492, Christopher Columbus was not widely known among Americans until the mid-1700s.
Spencer Arnold Getty Images

It's been 521 years since the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus "sailed the ocean blue/in fourteen hundred and ninety-two." Since then, there have been thousands of parades, speeches and statues commemorating Columbus, along with a critical rethinking of his life and legacy.

But the question remains, how did a man who never set foot on North America get a federal holiday in his name? While Columbus did arrive in the "New World" when he cast anchor in the Bahamas, he never made it to the United States.

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Planet Money
9:45 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Economics Nobel: Nobody Knows What Stocks Are Going To Do Today

The Nobel Foundation

If you want to honor today's Nobel laureates in economics, turn off CNBC and ignore everyone who says they know what the stock market is going to do today, tomorrow, or next week.

The award went to three economists — Eugene F. Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert J. Shiller — for their work studying asset prices.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Americans Win Economics Nobel For Interpreting Stock Prices

Three American professors have won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Economics for their work in identifying long-term trends in the prices of stocks and bonds, based in part on analyzing the role of risk.

Professors Robert J. Shiller of Yale University and Eugene F. Fama and Lars Peter Hansen, both of the University of Chicago, won "for their empirical analysis of asset prices," the Royal Swedish Academy said in announcing the honor Monday.

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Business
7:46 am
Mon October 14, 2013

3 American Economists Win Nobel Prize

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics was awarded today to three American men - Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen, Robert Shiller. The Nobel committee cited their research in the predictability of stock prices, as well as other asset prices. We're going to find out more now from Zoe Chace of NPR's Planet Money team. She's on the line. Hi, Zoe.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: Each of these guy's names is a little familiar, I think to the layman, especially maybe Shiller. Who are they?

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Around the Nation
7:31 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Shutdown Hinders S.D. Post-Blizzard Cleanup

Heavy and wet snow weighs down tree branches on the west side of Rapid City, S.D. Earlier this month, a fierce October snowstorm hit ranchers in the state hard.
Kristina Barker Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 8:58 am

A freak October blizzard earlier this month killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota.

The number of animals is hard to confirm. In part, because the federal agency tasked with tallying livestock losses after a disaster is closed during the partial government shutdown.

October is often a great weather month to be in South Dakota, which is one reason why the early October blizzard caught so many off guard.

Todd Collins lost a fifth of his herd in this storm. "My dad is 80 years old, and he says he's never seen a killer storm the first of October."

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Europe
7:29 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Three U.S. Economists Win Nobel Prize

Americans Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller won the Nobel prize for economics on Monday for developing new methods to study trends in asset markets.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the three had laid the foundation of the current understanding of asset prices.

While it's hard to predict whether stock or bond prices will go up or down in the short term, it's possible to foresee movements over periods of three years or longer, the academy said.

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Europe
6:37 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Man Leaves Wife Accidentally At Gas Station

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. If you've forgotten to replace the fuel cap at the gas station, you could do worse. A German man was driving back from his honeymoon in France. He pulled over to fuel up, thinking his bride, sleeping in the back seat, remained put. She actually got out to use the facilities. He drove on, and two and a half hours later, he noticed his wife was gone. The man called police, who said she was patiently waiting back at the gas station. This is probably not what she meant when she said, no better or for worse.

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