Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

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Story Synopsis

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Sal Monteiro and Sheila Capece met at the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence in Providence. He spent time in prison for second degree murder. She advocates for victims of crime.

Listenwise helps teachers use stories from RIPR in their classrooms. To find more public radio stories and lessons for your middle and high school ELA, social studies, and science classrooms you can sign up sign up for a free Listenwise account!

Story Synopsis

John Bender

At a time of increasing debate over racial, religious and political divides, Rhode Islanders share their experiences of reaching beyond the differences that keep many communities apart.

In this ongoing series, we meet people like Adewole Akinbi and Heather Gaydos, whose professional relationship has evolved into something more like family after the death of a co-worker. We also meet a former gang member, Jose Rodriguez, who has become friends with the Providence police officer who once hassled him on the streets.

Ambar Espinoza

In recent years, Rhode Islanders have spotted wild visitors not typically found in the Ocean State: Arctic beluga whales in Narragansett Bay and even snowy owls. It turns out the Central Landfill in Johnston is another draw for wildlife.

MICHAEL TSARION / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

National Grid is withdrawing its application for the project informally known as the pipeline tax.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Invenergy, the company proposing to build a power plant in Burrillville, offered Johnston the same 20-year water contract as it offered to Woonsocket, according to the company's development director. Johnston stands to earn more than $18 million dollars over 20 years.

CEYHUN (JAY) ISIK / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

In power plant news, Tuesday night while the Woonsocket City Council rejected selling water to Invenergy, the Johnston town council unanimously approved such a deal within a couple of minutes.

Ceyhun (Jay) Isik / Creative Commons License via Flickr

Woonsocket officials say they will carefully consider a proposal from a power plant company to buy water from municipal supplies. The city will also consider the concerns of residents.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

After more than a year of work, Rhode Island’s climate change council has finalized a plan to reduce this state’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

It’s been nearly two years since the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management and the Attorney General filed a lawsuit against a metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront for allegedly failing to comply with environmental protection laws.

RI Electoral College Casts Votes For Clinton, Kaine

Dec 19, 2016
Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

In Rhode Island, four electors unanimously cast their votes for Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine for the presidential ticket, after they were escorted into the House Chamber to cast their ballots Monday afternoon.  

Earlier in the day, protesters demonstrated outside the Statehouse, calling for electors across the country to join forces and halt the election of Republican Donald Trump.

State Electoral College President Clay Pell said Rhode Island's electors heeded the call of the majority of voters in the Ocean State. 

“I voted for Hillary on November 8th and together with Rhode Islanders across the state, we voted overwhelmingly for Hillary," said Pell. "So for me, there was no question of voting for someone other than Hillary, because she had the will of the people.”

Pell said it’s sad Clinton will not take office, but he’s proud to be a part of the Electoral College. He said the system is imperfect, but electors must follow the rules. 

After casting votes, State Rep. Grace Diaz, one of the state's four electors, initiated a call for a bipartisan committee to investigate suspected Russian interference in the election.  Pell said this is an effort to protect the integrity of American elections in the future.

“This is not about changing the outcome," said Pell. "This is about defending the democratic will of the people. President-elect Trump is the president-elect. I believe in the peaceful transfer of power. But I also believe in making sure that he stands with the intelligence community and the American people and not with the Russian government.”

Pell said it’s not too late to investigate how Russians interfered. He said the American people have a right to know more about the government intelligence that concluded Russia swayed the elections by hacking and releasing emails of important members of the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

 

Protesters Brave The Cold With Message For Electoral College 

With chants of, "Democracy, yes! Donald Trump, no!" a small group of demonstrators ignored sub-freezing temperatures, and little chance of success, to make their views known outside the Rhode Island Statehouse Monday morning.

RIPR File Photo

It’s been a big week for wind energy. The nation’s first offshore wind farm is up and running off the coast of Block Island. And another Rhode Island wind company just scored a grant from the National Science FoundationAquanis is a tech company trying to improve the efficiency of wind turbines. We introduce you to the wind energy company you may not know about.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The company proposing to build a power plant in Burrillville is tapping into the city of Woonsocket for water to cool the plant. 

Ryan Caron King / New England News Collaborative

The nation’s first offshore wind farm is officially connected to the electric grid, Deepwater Wind announced today.

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