Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

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Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Earlier this spring, we brought you a report from our series Battle With The Sea about the impact of climate change on Aquidneck Island's drinking water with warmer temperatures, heavier rains, and more intense storms. But there’s more to the story. We pick up where we left off.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

State and federal officials are turning to researchers at the University of Rhode Island to help them understand what happened at Salty Brine State Beach over the weekend when a mini explosion knocked a woman into a jetty, leaving her with two broken ribs. A team of scientists will convene at the beach at low tide later today to collect samples in their search for answers.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Authorities have ruled out the possibility that a cable underneath the beach might have caused the blast, which knocked a woman into a jetty on Saturday.

Updating reporters on their investigation, state police reported few new details in the case that has left officials and residents scratching their heads.

Matt Gineo / RIPR

Three groups on Aquidneck Island have kicked off a pilot program to remove debris from Newport Harbor.

Clean Ocean Access executive director Dave McLaughlin said the first of several summer cleanups takes place next week in partnership with Newport Maritime Alliance and the Newport Waterfront Commission.

“We’re going to get two divers in the water and we’re going to clean a portion of the submerged debris on the harbor floor,” said McLaughlin. “It’s going to provide a baseline of what do we see from the surface and what did we find on the floor when we got down there.”

RIPR FILE

The City of Providence has rolled out a new initiative to implement the city’s sustainability plan, aimed at reducing the effects of climate change. The initiative has a strong focus on community outreach.


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